Traditional recipes

The Next Iron Chef Winner: Marc Forgione

The Next Iron Chef Winner: Marc Forgione

The final challenge: a Thanksgiving battle between two New York chefs for the Iron Chef title. The winner? The chef who didn’t make a turkey, Marc Forgione. Read about his regrets, fear of the judges’ table and the new season of Iron Chef America.

You and Marco Canora seem to have a good relationship; what was it like battling him?

You know, honest to god, I’m not just saying this, but if it were anyone that I wanted to go up against in the final, it would be him. He was such a good cook the whole time; he didn’t make any mistakes. It was kind of like going up against Iceman, and when I think about it, I was like Maverick. I always said that if I wanted to win, I wanted to go up against the best, and that was Marco.

How did you feel about judging your peers on the show?

I liked it actually. It helped us to get to know each other, and not just in a personality way. You can really get to know someone by tasting their food.

Did you find the Secret Ingredient Challenges or the Chairman's Challenges to be more difficult?

It depended; the Chairman’s Challenges had a different kind of energy, because you knew you could go home. But they are all difficult in their own way.

If you could rewind time, which challenge would you like to do over and what would you make instead?

That’s easy actually, in the four corners challenge, I had a great story for the east with Delmonico’s steak tartare, and for the west, but then for some reason I stopped my story. I have no idea why; I should have gone to the north and picked someone like Jasper White and done a lobster bisque, and then gone south for someone like Paul Prudhomme and done a blackened fish. I should I have stuck with the classics, but for some reason I just stopped.

Which of the dishes you made would you re-create in your restaurant?

There were a couple. The chicken pot pie, the bread crumbs and fish dish that I made on the fishing battle are ones that we do here now. My take on the niçoise salad for the same battle is sometimes used for specials, and the fried root beer too. On the show, I was influenced a lot by what we do in the restaurant so it makes sense to overlap.

The whole process is a huge test of character, is there something new that you learned about yourself?

Yeah, I think I learned that whatever the odds are, that no matter how tired you are, and when you think you can’t do it anymore, you can. I didn’t know that about myself before.

For the new season of Iron Chef America that airs this Sunday, how does competing on that show differ from The Next Iron Chef?

Well, on Iron Chef you are just battling to win, and in the other you are battling to not go home. I try to describe this to people, but when you are standing up there for judgement, waiting to find out if you are going to go home or not, it’s like you’re waiting for a jail sentence. If someone tells you that you’re going home, it’s like being sent to jail. At least that’s how it feels for me.

Is there anyone that you are looking forward to battling that you haven’t yet?

Anyone who thinks I’m not that good.

If you could pick your top three secret ingredients for your upcoming battles, what would they be?

I’d love to work with uni (sea urchin), that Wagyu steak that Marco had in the semi-finals, and now that I think about it, that pork that Ming had.

How did your father, Larry Forgione, feel about you winning the title?

I sat with my family last night, watching it at the restaurant. It takes a lot to make my old man cry, and I’m pretty sure I saw tears in his eyes.

At home, what’s a go-to dish that you like to make for yourself?

Not to use a cliché, but a roasted chicken. I try to change it up, but usually the base is a little herb butter between the skin and the flesh, so that it gets nice and crispy.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Recipe of the week: 'Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel'

Marc Forgione, an award-winning chef and the season three winner of the popular series "Next Iron Chef," combines youthful ingenuity with traditional American flavors in his new cookbook, Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories from the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant. This recipe for Apple Pie Soufflé + Salted Caramel is a perfect sweet and salty ending to any dinner party: get ready to hear a lot of "wow" from your guests.

APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ + SALTED CARAMEL

MAKES 4 TO 6 (6-OUNCE) SOUFFLÉS

This dessert was originally created during an "Iron Chef America" episode for a familiar-to-me themed battle&mdashThanksgiving&mdashexcept this was round two, and I was paired with Jose Garces, an Iron Chef, against two other Iron Chefs: Michael Symon and Bobby Flay. Since I was going up against some very stiff competition, I knew I had to dig deep into my bag of tricks and pull out something that would truly wow the judges. The soufflé didn&rsquot disappoint, and Henry Winkler, a.k.a. &ldquothe Fonz,&rdquo who was one of the judges, said it was the best soufflé he&rsquod ever had.

The recipe here makes six dessert-size soufflés, but if you happen to be making dinner for four people, stick with these proportions (3 cups apple puree to 1½ cups whipped egg whites) to get a perfect soufflé every time. No one has ever complained about having an extra soufflé lying around.

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus additional to taste
  • ¾ ounce (1½ tablespoons) unsalted butter, cubed, plus additional for buttering the ramekins
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus additional for dusting the ramekins
  • 6 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup egg whites (from about 6 large eggs), room temperature
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • Confectioners&rsquo sugar, for dusting the soufflés

1. Combine the sugar, corn syrup and ¼ cup of water in a very clean saucepot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook the caramel until it becomes a medium amber color (or the color of an Irish set­ter)&mdashwatch carefully and do not let the caramel burn. While the caramel cooks, do not stir it with a spoon, but gently swirl the caramel around the pot. Use a clean, moist pastry brush to remove any sugar crystals that form on the sides of the pot. As soon as the caramel is ready, remove it from the heat and gently whisk in the heavy cream and butter. Be careful: the caramel will bubble and sputter, so stand back. Whisk in the salt. Taste and add more salt if you like. Transfer the caramel to a bowl you will have about 2 cups salted caramel. Refrigerate the sauce until needed. The sauce will keep, covered, for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

PREPARE THE APPLE PIE SOUFFLÉ

2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF position the rack in the mid­dle. Generously butter 4 to 6 (6-ounce) ramekins and dust the inside of the ramekins with sugar and cinna­mon. Set the ramekins aside.

3. Toss the apples with the butter, 1 cup of the sugar, the cinnamon, ginger and cloves and transfer the mixture to an ovenproof roasting pan. Bake the apples for about 30 minutes or until they are soft and falling apart.

4. Transfer the cooked apples, without their cooking liq­uid, to a blender and puree until they are completely smooth the texture should be smoother and finer than regular applesauce. (At the restaurant, we use a Vitamix to get our apple puree to the right consistency, but at home you can use a regular blender and then strain your puree through a fine-mesh strainer or a chinois to get any remaining lumps out.) Transfer the apple puree to a bowl and let cool to room temperature. You should have about 4 cups apple puree.

5. Place the egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat the egg whites on medium speed and slowly add the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and cream of tartar. Continue beat­ing until the egg whites become foamy. Raise the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form (when the whisk is lifted from the mixture, there should be a standing peak in the area where it was lifted).

6. Measure 3 cups of the apple puree into a separate bowl, and use a rubber spatula to gently fold in 1½ cups of the whipped egg whites.

7. Fill the ramekins to the top with the batter, and smooth out the tops with an offset spatula. Place a kitchen towel on the counter and gently tap the ramekins on the towel to release any trapped air bubbles. Transfer the ramekins to a baking sheet and bake for about 8 minutes or until the soufflés have risen and are firm when lightly tapped. While the soufflés bake, do not open the door to the oven.

8. While the soufflés bake, gently reheat the Salted Caramel in a small saucepan over low heat until warm and easily pourable.

9. Remove the soufflés and sprinkle them with con­fectioners&rsquo sugar. Poke a small hole in the middle of each soufflé and drizzle warmed Salted Caramel into it. Serve the soufflés immediately, with the remaining salted caramel sauce on the side.


Watch the video: Thanksgiving Remix: Marc Forgiones Turkey Under a Cinder Block (October 2021).