Traditional recipes

Rooster with wine

Rooster with wine

A food that is easy to prepare and especially extraordinarily good.

  • 1 boneless chicken breast
  • 2 pulps
  • 1 onion
  • 3 carrots
  • 2 gulii
  • 400 ml wine
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 link parsley
  • salt pepper

Servings: 4

Preparation time: less than 90 minutes

HOW TO PREPARE THE RECIPE Rooster with wine:

We cut the thighs in half, and we cut the chest into pieces big enough to be approximately equal. Sprinkle salt and pepper over the pieces of meat and roll them in flour. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a wok or large saucepan. Fry the meat for a few minutes, until it coagulates. Add finely chopped onion and garlic and a small glass of water. When the onion becomes whitish, add the sliced ​​carrots, diced cabbage, wine and bay leaf.

Cover and simmer for 40 to 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until all ingredients are cooked through. After turning off the heat, remove the bay leaf from the food.


Wine rooster (best)

Absolutely delicious! The whole family loved it and we all asked for it again. Lots of steps and long preparations, not to mention the 12 hours of maceration but the result is worth it. To be redone is certain.

Evelyne G.

Very good! Better than my mom’s (shut ..) I did it with thigh highs and after the pan steps I put everything in my crucible and oven at 350f for 1:20

William S.

Really far from the real wine rooster recipe. Already the wine rooster is made with a rooster and not a chicken (as its name suggests) the flesh is different firmer and it can stand to be simmered longer. I do not recommend it at all.

Maico R.

Absolutely exquisite! Tender and tasty chicken, sauce perfectly seasoned with small onions and mushrooms, absolutely delicious. Accompanied by mashed potatoes and carrot / parsley julienne.

Arnaud K.

Lots of steps and time for a fair result only! There is also no mention of adding carrots to the recipe, which is nonetheless an essential food for a good rooster in wine.

Eve R.

It’s a success. A tasty and savory dish, the whole family loved it. Absolutely to redo.

Jean S.

Hello, I compare the recipe with that of Paul Bocuse, the latter goes happily with the wine or a bottle and a half of red wine. (Beaujolais) It must surely change the taste. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM7DrO_4BVw&t=784s

France R.

Is it possible to specify the number of servings for this recipe? Another question: Can the baking step be done in the oven? If so, at what temperature and how long excluding the time to thicken the sauce?

France D.

Is it better to remove the skin from the chicken? thanks

Sylvie D.

I love this wine rooster recipe! My husband, who had never eaten one, loved it! Thanks for this recipe.

Louise L.

Florence D: When you say you put everything in a slow cooker, does that include handled butter? The idea of ​​asparagus is worth remembering!

Stéphane R.

Simply delicious.

Florence D.

Simmered! After browning the chicken pieces, I put them in the slow cooker and after deglazing the rest of the ingredients including the mushrooms and the rest of the wine marinade with the cognac, I put everything in the slow cooker for 5 hours! The last half hour I put a bunch of asparagus on it !! Delicieux

Denis g.

Can it be frozen if done in advance?

JOSÉE T.

Absolutely delicious. I had a very large grain chicken and used only my breasts and thighs. Marinated all night. From the moment I started browning the bacon and grilling the chicken, until it was ready to put on our plates, it took 2 1/2 hrs. So delicious. I still suggest taking a good red wine and not the "picket".


Cooking the Classics: Coq au Vin Recipe and History

"A chicken in every pot." So said King Henri IV of France, in what would become a famous political promise of general welfare, from peasants on up. Out of Henri’s famous promise grew a dish, one of several that are recognized the world round as quintessentially French: coq-au-vin recipe. This is not to say that Henri had chicken stew braised in wine in mind when he made his proclamation, but this dish has come to be associated with the idea behind the quote. It is a simple dish to prepare (here is the original coq au vin recipe by French chef Paul Bocuse), inexpensive, and utterly delicious.

WHAT IS COQ IN WINE?
The basic components of coq-au-vin (literally “rooster in wine”) are chicken on the bone and wine (traditionally Burgundy, but in theory one could use anything, with Riesling popular in Alsace). The recipe is not dissimilar from another of the well-known traditional French dishes, beef bourguignon. Both begin with sautéed onions and garlic in the butter, then add meat that should be browned, and finally include mushrooms and some fatty bacon (lardons), before pouring in enough wine to cover the meat. Then it’s a simple matter of letting it braise, low and slow. This is best prepared in a Dutch oven, like a Le Creuset can if you want to go all-French, and can be made either on the stovetop or in the oven, so long as the pot is covered. The longer you cook, provided the contents of the pot remain moist, the richer the flavor and the softer the meat. It is as fool-proof as cooking can get, which means that even I, who cook with ten thumbs, can do a pretty good job with it.

Braised stews have long been a peasant favorite because they make an elaborate, wholesome meal out of whatever ingredients you can afford or scrounge together. Any root vegetables can be added, any cut of meat can be used, even tough cuts (as in beef bourguignon, which require long cooking to become tender) —the very fact that the dish is “coq” au vin and not “poulet” (chicken) au vin indicates its peasant origins, for rooster meat is much tougher than chicken, requiring long slow braising to make it edible, whereas chicken could be cooked a short amount of time and be delicious. In practice, low-income families could throw any ingredients they have available into a pot of water, if there was no wine handy, and transform it into a filling stew.

THE ORIGINS OF COQ AU VIN
The precise origins of coq-au-vin are unknown. Because surely people have braised chicken in wine since ancient times, it would be a surprise to find a specific origin moment. An 1864 cookbook called Cookery for English Households offers a French recipe called white wine chicken (chicken in white wine), which is a parallel to traditional rooster. But the recipe really grew famous thanks to Julia Child, who is almost single-handedly responsible for popularizing French cooking in the United States. Along with other clichéd but delicious classics (snails, sole meuniere, beef bourguignon), Coq au come was featured in Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1961) and the spinoff television show, The French Chef, bringing this hearty traditional dish into the homes of Americans who might otherwise have never been exposed to French cuisine.

While the recipe is simple, there are a few tricks that I learned in the process of preparing this dish that “kick it up a notch.” If you marinate the chicken in wine overnight, the meat impregnates with flavor. Sautee onions and garlic and lardons with butter in the bottom of the Dutch oven first, then remove them once the onions are browned and set them aside. Then, in the empty pot that retains the oils and crusty bits from the sautee, throw in the chicken at a high temperature, so that it browns on all sides. Only then return the onions, garlic and lardons to the pot. This insures that everything is nicely brown, which would not be the case if all the ingredients were crowded into the pot at once. With all the ingredients in the pot, add the wine until the chicken is covered. Choose a wine that you would be happy to drink — you can use a cheap one, but better, richer-flavored wines will add more to the dish. But here’s a trick. Chicken is so much softer and quickly-cooked than rooster that the original recipe (even Julia’s) must be tinkered with, if you actually use chicken as opposed to tough-but-flavorful rooster. You can get away with cooking chicken for much less time, and over-cooking it can result in the meat disintegrating into the gravy. This will still taste good to dip your bread in, but it isn’t coq-au-vin proper. If you are using fresh chicken, follow the same instructions, but only cook the chicken in the wine for a shorter time, less than an hour. Julia’s recipe is a 20th century update on the classic, aimed at the high-end French restaurant experience. She does not encourage you to braise the chicken at all but only brown it, cook it through, then remove it and only then add wine to the pot and let that braise with the onions, mushrooms and lardons, in order to produce a thick gravy to spoon over the chicken. If you want to get fancy and old-school, once the dish is cooked through, you can pour out some of the remaining gravy and heat it gently in a saucepan, thickening it with chicken blood (you do have a vial of chicken blood ever at hand in your fridge, don't you), then pour it like a sauce over the chicken and vegetables.

Once Sunday comes around, fire up some Coq au come. From Henri IV to Herbert Hoover, Sunday stew is the thing to do.


Cooking the Classics: Coq au Vin Recipe and History

"A chicken in every pot." So said King Henri IV of France, in what would become a famous political promise of general welfare, from peasants on up. Out of Henri’s famous promise grew a dish, one of several that are recognized the world round as quintessentially French: coq-au-vin recipe. This is not to say that Henri had chicken stew braised in wine in mind when he made his proclamation, but this dish has come to be associated with the idea behind the quote. It is a simple dish to prepare (here is the original coq au vin recipe by French chef Paul Bocuse), inexpensive, and utterly delicious.

WHAT IS COQ IN WINE?
The basic components of coq-au-vin (literally “rooster in wine”) are chicken on the bone and wine (traditionally Burgundy, but in theory one could use anything, with Riesling popular in Alsace). The recipe is not dissimilar from another of the well-known traditional French dishes, beef bourguignon. Both begin with sautéed onions and garlic in the butter, then add meat that should be browned, and finally include mushrooms and some fatty bacon (lardons), before pouring in enough wine to cover the meat. Then it’s a simple matter of letting it braise, low and slow. This is best prepared in a Dutch oven, like a Le Creuset can if you want to go all-French, and can be made either on the stovetop or in the oven, so long as the pot is covered. The longer you cook, provided the contents of the pot remain moist, the richer the flavor and the softer the meat. It is as fool-proof as cooking can get, which means that even I, who cook with ten thumbs, can do a pretty good job with it.

Braised stews have long been a peasant favorite because they make an elaborate, wholesome meal out of whatever ingredients you can afford or scrounge together. Any root vegetables can be added, any cut of meat can be used, even tough cuts (as in beef bourguignon, which require long cooking to become tender) —the very fact that the dish is “coq” au vin and not “poulet” (chicken) au vin indicates its peasant origins, for rooster meat is much tougher than chicken, requiring long slow braising to make it edible, whereas chicken could be cooked a short amount of time and be delicious. In practice, low-income families could throw any ingredients they have available into a pot of water, if there was no wine handy, and transform it into a filling stew.

THE ORIGINS OF COQ AU VIN
The precise origins of coq-au-vin are unknown. Because surely people have braised chicken in wine since ancient times, it would be a surprise to find a specific origin moment. An 1864 cookbook called Cookery for English Households offers a French recipe called white wine chicken (chicken in white wine), which is a parallel to traditional rooster. But the recipe really grew famous thanks to Julia Child, who is almost single-handedly responsible for popularizing French cooking in the United States. Along with other clichéd but delicious classics (snails, sole meuniere, beef bourguignon), Coq au come was featured in Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1961) and the spinoff television show, The French Chef, bringing this hearty traditional dish into the homes of Americans who might otherwise have never been exposed to French cuisine.

While the recipe is simple, there are a few tricks that I learned in the process of preparing this dish that “kick it up a notch.” If you marinate the chicken in wine overnight, the meat impregnates with flavor. Sautee onions and garlic and lardons with butter in the bottom of the Dutch oven first, then remove them once the onions are browned and set them aside. Then, in the empty pot that retains the oils and crusty bits from the sautee, throw in the chicken at a high temperature, so that it browns on all sides. Only then return the onions, garlic and lardons to the pot. This insures that everything is nicely brown, which would not be the case if all the ingredients were crowded into the pot at once. With all the ingredients in the pot, add the wine until the chicken is covered. Choose a wine that you would be happy to drink — you can use a cheap one, but better, richer-flavored wines will add more to the dish. But here’s a trick. Chicken is so much softer and quickly-cooked than rooster that the original recipe (even Julia’s) must be tinkered with, if you actually use chicken as opposed to tough-but-flavorful rooster. You can get away with cooking chicken for much less time, and over-cooking it can result in the meat disintegrating into the gravy. This will still taste good to dip your bread in, but it isn’t coq-au-vin proper. If you are using fresh chicken, follow the same instructions, but only cook the chicken in the wine for a shorter time, less than an hour. Julia’s recipe is a 20th century update on the classic, aimed at the high-end French restaurant experience. She does not encourage you to braise the chicken at all but only brown it, cook it through, then remove it and only then add wine to the pot and let that braise with the onions, mushrooms and lardons, in order to produce a thick gravy to spoon over the chicken. If you want to get fancy and old-school, once the dish is cooked through, you can pour out some of the remaining gravy and heat it gently in a saucepan, thickening it with chicken blood (you do have a vial of chicken blood ever at hand in your fridge, don't you), then pour it like a sauce over the chicken and vegetables.

Once Sunday comes around, fire up some Coq au come. From Henri IV to Herbert Hoover, Sunday stew is the thing to do.


Burgundy grandmother-style wine rooster

A roasted chicken with small onions, bacon and mushrooms, flambéed with Marc de Bourgogne, cooked in a good full-bodied red wine. Served with small golden croutons, we find the extraordinary comic of granny's kitchen. We enjoy it with our eyes closed and we find his childhood, the happy moments of celebration at his grandmother's house.

This recipe and others of the same subject in.

Family recipes
A great way to celebrate grandmothers in the kitchen.

A touch of red wine on your plate
Red wine in the kitchen is classic and delicious.


If you can't find small 3-pound chickens, use one 4-pound chicken plus 1 pound of chicken legs. The chicken stock should have enough gelatin in it that it sets like jello when chilled. If it is thinner than that, you will need to add gelatin. Pour the stock into a large bowl and sprinkle with 2 packets of unflavored gelatin. Let the gelatin fully hydrate. The stock will have a grainy appearance but will smooth out once added to the recipe.

Frozen pearl onions can be used in place of fresh to use frozen onions, cook direct from frozen, skipping Step 2. This braise can be made ahead and tastes even better the next day: Complete recipe through Step 7, then let cool at room temperature for 1 hour before transferring Dutch oven to refrigerator reheat gently in 350 ° F oven before proceeding with Step 8.


If you can't find small 3-pound chickens, use one 4-pound chicken plus 1 pound of chicken legs. The chicken stock should have enough gelatin in it that it sets like jello when chilled. If it is thinner than that, you will need to add gelatin. Pour the stock into a large bowl and sprinkle with 2 packets of unflavored gelatin. Let the gelatin fully hydrate. The stock will have a grainy appearance but will smooth out once added to the recipe.

Frozen pearl onions can be used in place of fresh to use frozen onions, cook direct from frozen, skipping Step 2. This braise can be made ahead and tastes even better the next day: Complete recipe through Step 7, then let cool at room temperature for 1 hour before transferring Dutch oven to refrigerator reheat gently in 350 ° F oven before proceeding with Step 8.


What to serve with Coq au Vin?

My personal favorite is to serve this with buttery mashed potatoes and a green salad. The gravy is so good poured over potatoes and the green salad brings a little freshness to the plate. Here are some other ideas:

And for dessert, try Julia Child's Chocolate Mousse. It's delicious!


What to serve with Coq au Vin?

My personal favorite is to serve this with buttery mashed potatoes and a green salad. The gravy is so good poured over potatoes and the green salad brings a little freshness to the plate. Here are some other ideas:

And for dessert, try Julia Child's Chocolate Mousse. It's delicious!


The Best Coq Au Vin at Home

When you hear “coq au vin” what comes to mind? Intensive work? Too fancy to be practical? Maybe just a bit intimidating? What if I told you none of that was true? In reality, this classic French dish is a simple, one-pot wonder full of layered, rich flavors that is perfect for your next family meal or dinner party. If you’re not quite convinced yet, please read on, because you will be!


We Love You Chicken Rooster with Wine.

See, I told you it was easy. We love this recipe for coq au vin, because it is:

  • Easy.
  • Comforting.
  • Great for company.
  • Perfect for winter.
  • Insanely delicious.
  • Makes us feel fancy, without stressing us out with too many complicated steps.


Video: Wine Tasting: Rooster Hill Vineyards 2015 Chardonnay (December 2021).