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Scientists Grow Mangoes in Space

Scientists Grow Mangoes in Space

Chinese researchers’ grew insect-resistant space mangos

Wikimedia/WA Djatmiko

Scientists in China are looking to space to grow a new kind of better, more insect-resistant mango.

Could space travel be the future of fruit? Researchers in China think sending fruit to space could help them develop better produce, and the first crop of “space mangoes” is about ready to come to fruition.

According to Shanghaiist, researchers sent mangoes to space in November as part of China’s Shenzhou-11 mission, and astronauts subjected the mangoes to different environmental conditions in an attempt to get them to develop advantageous new genetic traits as quickly as possible. Now cells from those mangoes have been developed into buds in a research lab in Hainan, and scientists say the new “space mangoes” will develop higher quality fruit and more of it than normal mangoes that have never been to space. According to lead researcher Peng Longrong, the space mangoes are also supposed to be more resistant to insects. There’s no telling when or if the space mangoes will make it to the market, but when they do, check out some of our best mango recipes for some good things to do with them.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


5 Foods Astronauts Cannot Eat in Space

Manned spaceflight began in 1961 when the Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took man’s first flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Humans have, ever since, been exploring space through a variety of missions including the International Space Station, which has housed individual Astronauts and Cosmonauts for periods of up to a year. Nevertheless, life in space would not be possible with the often specialized foods that consumed in orbit and beyond. In a microgravity environment, however, certain foods are impractical.

Here are five foods that NASA Astronauts can’t eat in space:

Bread has long been avoided by the space program as it often lacks the structure and shelf life needed to work as space food. Instead, astronauts often use tortillas.

Russian space explorers, known as Cosmonauts, have a long tradition of consuming limited quantities of alcohol in space, but NASA astronauts are barred from having a drink in space.

3. Salt and Pepper

Salt, pepper and other granular spices and seasonings can make for a huge mess in microgravity. NASA has, instead, developed liquid alternatives for astronauts to use.

The carbonation in beverages like soda act differently in space than on Earth. As a result the carbon dioxide bubbles remain within the liquid as opposed to being released as a gas for an effervescent pop. This can cause astronauts digestive discomfort and, as a result, Coke and Sprite remain on the ground.

5. Astronaut Ice Cream

Astronaut Ice Cream is one of the most popular souvenirs from science oriented gift shops around the world (It accounts for 7% of total sales in our own Sci Store, where we sell more than 30,000 packages each year), but there is no evidence of it ever having flown in space. Because of the brittle and crumbly nature of the dehydrated ice cream, Astronaut Ice Cream could interfere with sensitive equipment and make for a dusty environment in microgravity.


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