Traditional recipes

Mr. Cannon: A Brand New, (Very) Hidden Gem in New York’s Seaport District

Mr. Cannon: A Brand New, (Very) Hidden Gem in New York’s Seaport District

As you walk the historic cobblestone streets of New York’s Seaport District, you may not realize you’ve passed by one of the city’s most secretive speakeasies. Tucked inside an alley off of Front Street, Mr. Cannon is a cocktail lounge that offers classic cocktails with a twist.

Before sipping a cocktail and unwinding on one of the ultra-plush sofas, you must first overcome the challenge of finding the place. The fun exploration begins on Front Street between Fulton and Beekman Street, where you’ll look for a building with the words “Cannon’s Walk” on it. Through the doorway is a small corridor that leads you to glass doors and the historic walkway. Once through the doors, make a left and you’ll find a black door with a rat on it. Ring the bell and get ready to expand your cocktail consciousness.

The brainchild of the Howard Hughes Corporation and The Lure Group, Mr. Cannon's rustic decor features exposed brick, vintage seating, and artwork. The low lighted speakeasy transports you back to a bygone era that will make you want to stay the whole night.

The lounge does not serve any food, but they make up for it with their flavorful libations by their house mixologist, Chris Kearns. Besides their signature cocktails, they offer Champagne bottle service, including Dom Perignon and Veuve Clicquot.

There are many standout cocktails, including the Earth and Elegance. The bright red cocktail is made with rum, gin, beets, pineapple and lemon juice, honey and mint. With herbal and citrus notes, this cocktail has the ideal balance of earthiness from the beets and sweetness from the pineapple juice. For people looking for something a little spiced and complex, they can try the Longshoreman, with vodka infused with roses and Chaga mushroom, green chile vodka, vermouth, lime, and honey on the rocks.

One drink that needs to be experienced at Mr. Cannon’s is their tableside mojito. Known as their Havana-Style Mojito, the drinks are made from a brass push cart that is full of all the ingredients. Once you select your choice of Bacardi Super or Bacardi Oakheart Rum, the mojito is made in front of you with crushed ice, simple syrup, and mint leaves.

After spending the night at Mr. Cannon’s, you will soon realize the Seaport District is home to your new favorite speakeasy. The only question you might have: Who is Mr. Cannon?


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, west of Midtown Manhattan. It is considered to be bordered by 34th Street (or 41st Street) to the south, 59th Street to the north, Eighth Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Until the 1970s, Hell's Kitchen was a bastion of poor and working-class Irish Americans. Though its gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission's Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area.

Since the early 1980s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Home of the Actors Studio training school, and adjacent to Broadway theatres, Hell's Kitchen has long been a home to fledgling and working actors. Today, the area has a large LGBTQ population and is home to a large number of LGBTQ bars and businesses.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Manhattan Community District 4. [1] It is patrolled by the 10th and Midtown North Precincts of the New York City Police Department. The area provides transport, medical, and warehouse-infrastructure support to the business district of Manhattan. It is also known for its extensive selection of multiethnic, small, and relatively inexpensive restaurants, delicatessens, bodegas, bars, and associated nightlife.


Watch the video: Η πιο παγωμένη νύχτα για το Τορόντο. Τώρα ό,τι συμβαίνει 1322021. OPEN TV (October 2021).