Traditional recipes

Golden cornbread recipe

Golden cornbread recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Bread
  • Bread without yeast
  • Cornbread

A slightly sweet American bread made with polenta or cornmeal. You can easily jazz it up by adding freshly chopped herbs, spring onions, bacon or grated cheese.

2654 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 125g plain flour
  • 125g cornmeal
  • 140g sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • 235ml milk
  • 80ml vegetable oil

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:25min ›Ready in:35min

  1. Preheat the oven to 200 C / Gas 6. Lightly grease a 23cm (9 inch) round cake tin.
  2. Combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt and baking powder in a large bowl. Stir in egg, milk and vegetable oil until well combined. Pour mixture into prepared tin.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven until a skewer inserted into the centre of the loaf comes out clean, 20 to 25 minutes.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(3143)

Reviews in English (2487)

Instead of baking this as a bread I used it as a topping for my Omega fish pie instead of the usual pastry. I did use less sugar than your original but apart from that it is almost identical.-11 Jul 2014

My first time ever making cornbread and this was a wonderful recipe! I added a bit less sugar as it seemed too much and it came out plenty sweet enough. The kids love it and say they want it every day lol. Also I used a brownie tin and cut it into squares-17 Mar 2014

Wow! This is an amazing recipe. It’s delicious and very easy to follow. Measurements are perfect .-23 May 2013


Easy Golden Fluffy Cornbread Recipe

This recipe makes a true golden cornbread that doesn&rsquot pretend to be anything other than a bread with deep corn flavor. Some people make a cake with a little bitty sprinkling of corn meal and a pound of sugar and call it a cornbread. Not me! This cornbread has the whole cup of yellow corn meal, so the corn flavor really comes through. It is not a cake, it is not a muffin, it is not dessert &ndash it is a BREAD that will elevate your meal to the whole new level!

Any beginner can make this cornbread easily, even if you never bake and don&rsquot even own a mixer! No mixer or special tools are needed &ndash just put all the ingredients in a bowl, mix (a fork will work for the mixing!), pour in a baking pan and bake. In comes the mixture, out comes the cornbread &ndash golden-yellow, light and fluffy!

The best feature of the cornbread is the CRUMB! What other kind of bread has such large, soft, yellow, mouthwatering crumb full of sweet corn flavor? Only cornbread can produce a crumb that just stands on its own and actually gets noticed. It will just crumble inside your mouth, melting away in deliciousness.

My favorite way of eating this cornbread is with a hearty bowl of chili. Chili and cornbread are just made for each other! In fact, cornbread is great with any kind of soup &ndash it turns a bowl of soup into a complete meal! If you are looking for a perfect chili recipe to go with this delicious cornbread, look no further &ndash I&rsquove got an amazingly easy crockpot chili recipe for you!

This hearty warm chili with a side of delicious golden cornbread &ndash mmmmmm! Doesn&rsquot get any better than that!

Got an Instant Pot? I have an Instant Pot version of this corn bread for you, check out my Instant Pot cornbread recipe.


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Recipe: Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread Perfect

Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread – And if you’re looking for some guidance on where to start, these are the skills you need to know.

Delicious Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread menu and strategy is just a culmination of the small tips I have discovered in the last 4 years. Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread happens to be a weekend cooking task, which can be to state you will need a couple of hours to perform it, but once you have got the technique down you can cook multiple set at a time for household picnics or simply to have cool leftovers to eat from the ice box on a whim.

In this case, We are likely to educate you on steps to make Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread DIY with simple ingredients, exactly like Chinese restaurants. My Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread recipe is the better on the planet!

I may also show you how to use up leftover steamed rice and make it into an appetizing, cheap, and flavorful meal for the whole family!

I attempted using somewhat less water than usual, which has been recommended elsewhere. It served only a little often, but other situations, I’d to add more and more water as the quinoa was cooking. Then, the dried quinoa absorbed way an excessive amount of the dressing I added later.

How to cook Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread?

Whether you live all on your own or are an active parent, finding enough time and power to get ready home-cooked dinners may appear like a daunting task. By the end of a busy day, eating at restaurants or purchasing in may feel like the quickest, easiest option. But comfort and processed food may take a significant cost on your mood and health.

Eateries usually serve more food than you ought to eat. Many restaurants serve portions which are two to three situations larger compared to the advised dietary guidelines. That encourages you to consume significantly more than you would in the home, adversely affecting your waistline, body pressure, and threat of diabetes.

Whenever you prepare your own dishes, you’ve more control within the ingredients. By cooking for yourself, you are able to make sure that you and your family eat new, healthful meals. This assists you to look and sense healthier, boost your power, secure your weight and mood, and enhance your rest and resilience to stress.

You can cook Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread using 8 ingredients and 5 steps. Here is how you achieve that.

Ingredients of Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread:

  1. Prepare 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil.
  2. Prepare 2 Cups of yellow cornmeal (I used Martha White).
  3. You need 3/4 cup of self rising flour.
  4. Prepare 1/4 cup of granulated sugar.
  5. Prepare 2 of large eggs.
  6. Prepare 1 cup of milk (I used buttermilk) plus more as needed.
  7. You need 1/4 cup of vegetable oil.
  8. Prepare 1 stick of butter, melted.

Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread instructions:

  1. Place 8 or 10 inch Cast Iron skillet in the oven. Add tablespoon of vegetable oil to the skillet. preheat the oven to 400 degrees..
  2. In a large bowl whisk all the dry ingredients together..
  3. Dump in all the wet ingredients and mix well to combine. Mixture should be creamy and pourable but not too thin. NOTE: if mix is too thick just add a tiny bit more milk until you get the right consistency..
  4. Increase the oven to 425 and pour the cornbread mix into the iron skillet. Bake 25 minutes or until golden and done..
  5. Be safe and careful in the kitchen!.

It’s cheaper to eat fast food than Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread

Initially glance, it might look that ingesting at a fast food restaurant is more affordable than making a home-cooked meal. But that’s rarely the case. A examine from the University of Washington School of Public Wellness exposed that people who prepare at home tend to have healthiest overall diet plans without higher food expenses. Still another study unearthed that regular home chefs spent about $60 monthly less on food than people who ate out more often.

I don’t know how to cook Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread

  • If you are threatened by the prospect of organizing a home-cooked dinner, it’s essential to consider that cooking is not an correct science.
  • It’s usually completely OK to omit an element or substitute one thing for another Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread.
  • Look online or purchase a basic cook book for quick menu ideas.
  • As with anything, the more you prepare, the higher you’ll become. Even if you’re a whole novice in the kitchen, you’ll soon grasp some quick, healthy meals.

What recipe should I take advantage of for Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread?

Neutral oils like canola, vegetable and peanut oil have higher smoke factors, making them ideal for frying chicken. Find out more about selecting the proper oil for frying.

What must and must not be performed when preparing Bigmama's Golden 1st Sunday Cornbread

  • Make sure everything is frozen in a sealable pot or bag.
  • Meat particularly must be properly wrapped.
  • Toast bread right from fridge, anti-waste plan urges.
  • Know that anything that’s a high water content, like lettuce, won’t be the same following being icy and then defrosted.
  • Make an effort to freeze every thing when at its freshest. Defrost meat totally before cooking, but other things such as for example bread for toasting can be grilled right from the freezer.
  • Never refreeze raw beef that has been icy and then thawed – you can, however, freeze baked beef that was icy when raw.
  • Ensure the fridge is not stuffed so full that air can not circulate.

Strategies for starting!

Begin with new, balanced ingredients. Baking sugary goodies such as for instance brownies, cakes, and cookies will not help your quality of life or your waistline. Likewise, putting a lot of sugar or salt may transform a healthier home-cooked dinner in to an detrimental one. To make certain your meals are great for you in addition to being delicious, focus on balanced elements and flavor with herbs rather than sugar or salt.

Inventory up on staples. Substances such as rice, rice, olive oil, herbs, flour, and inventory cubes are staples you’ll likely use regularly. Maintaining drinks of tuna, beans, tomatoes and bags of frozen veggies readily available may be beneficial in rustling up fast meals when you are sent for time.

Provide your self some leeway. It’s okay to burn the grain or over-cook the veggies. Following a several tries it are certain to get easier, quicker, and tastier!


6. Cornbread Buttermilk Soup

Using day-old cornbread, you can make a comforting soup for all seasons! This cornbread buttermilk soup is satisfyingly good even when served hot or cold.

The secret to getting the best taste is to use high-quality buttermilk, as it adds a rich, creamy texture to the dish.

Still, the cornbread is just as important because it also helps thicken the soup and adds a subtle sweetness.

A couple of pantry spices are also used to create a beautiful medley of flavors.


  1. Corn Bread:
    1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Combine corn meal, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl. Mix oil, egg, and milk together and add to dry ingredients, mixing until batter is uniform. Bake in a greased 9”x9”x2” pan for 20-25 minutes.
    1. Pour corn meal batter into greased or line muffin tins, filling about 2/3 full. Bake at 425°F for 15-20 minutes. Makes 12 muffins.
    1. For a sweeter, moister corn bread or muffin, make these changes to the recipe above: use 2/3 cup milk, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup oil and 2 eggs. Reduce the heat to 400°F. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
    1. This recipe is made available as a courtesy by Wilkins Rogers Mills.

    This Recipe is Featured In:


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    Special Diet Notes: Golden Dairy-Free Cornbread

    By ingredients, this recipe is dairy-free / non-dairy, nut-free, peanut-free, optionally soy-free, and vegetarian.

    For gluten-free, dairy-free cornbread, you can swap your favorite baking gluten-free flour blend for the all-purpose flour. I’ve made similar dairy-free cornbread recipes with gluten-free flour and they work quite well.

    For egg-free, dairy-free cornbread, you can use your favorite egg substitute. Aquafaba or powdered egg replacer tend to be the most seamless vegan options in recipes like this. However, I’ve seen wonderful, moist vegan cornbread recipes that use a generous 1/3 cup applesauce or pumpkin puree in place of the 2 eggs. Please note that swapping out both the eggs and the gluten would more dramatically affect the results and may need more adjustments.

    If you prefer to use a more natural sweetener, you can swap 1/3 cup honey or agave nectar for the sugar, but stir it in with the wet ingredients instead of the dry.


    I'm Todd Wilbur, Chronic Food Hacker

    For 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

    Includes eight (8) 79¢ recipes of your choice each month!

    ($23.88 annually)*
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    Includes eight (8) 79¢ recipes of your choice each month!

    I never thought dinner rolls were something I could get excited about until I got my hand into the breadbasket at Texas Roadhouse. The rolls are fresh out of the oven and they hit the table when you do, so there’s no waiting to tear into a magnificently gooey sweet roll topped with soft cinnamon butter. The first bite you take will make you think of a fresh cinnamon roll, and then you can’t stop eating it. And when the first roll’s gone, you are powerless to resist grabbing for just one more. But it’s never just one more. It’s two or three more, plus a few extra to take home for tomorrow.

    Discovering the secret to making rolls at home that taste as good as the real ones involved making numerous batches of dough, each one sweeter than the last (sweetened with sugar, not honey—I checked), until a very sticky batch, proofed for 2 hours, produced exactly what I was looking for. You can make the dough with a stand mixer or a handheld one, the only difference being that you must knead the dough by hand without a stand mixer. When working with the dough add a little bit of flour at a time to keep it from sticking, and just know that the dough will be less sticky and more workable after the first rise.

    Roll the dough out and measure it as specified here, and after a final proofing and a quick bake—plus a generous brushing of butter on the tops—you will produce dinner rolls that look and taste just like the best rolls I’ve had at any famous American dinner chain.

    Crafting a clone of Olive Garden’s signature Lasagna Classico became the perfect opportunity to create a beautiful multi-layered lasagna hack recipe that uses up the whole box of lasagna noodles and fills the baking pan all the way to the top. This Top Secret Recipe makes a lasagna that tips the scale at nearly 10 pounds and will feed hungry mouths for days, with every delicious layer copied directly from the carefully dissected Olive Garden original.

    I found a few credible bits of intel in a video of an Olive Garden chef demonstrating what he claims is the real formula on a midday news show, but the recipe was abbreviated for TV and the chef left out some crucial information. One ingredient he conspicuously left out of the recipe is the secret layer of Cheddar cheese located near the middle of the stack. I wasn’t expecting to find Cheddar in lasagna, but when I carefully separated the layers from several servings of the original dish, there was the golden melted cheesy goodness in every slice.

    This clone recipe will make enough for 8 big portions, but if you make slightly smaller slices this is easily enough food to fill twelve lasagna-loving bellies. If you like lasagna, you're going to love this version.

    Browse my other Olive Garden clone recipes here.

    Getting a table at the 123-year-old original Rao’s restaurant in New York City is next to impossible. The tables are “owned” by regulars who schedule their meals months in advance, so every table is full every night, and that’s the way it’s been for the last 38 years. The only way an outsider would get to taste the restaurant’s fresh marinara sauce is to be invited by a regular.

    If that isn’t in the stars for you, you could buy a bottle of the sauce at your local market (if they even have it). It won't be fresh, and it's likely to be the most expensive sauce in the store, but it still has that great Rao's taste. An even better solution is to copy the sauce for yourself using this new and very easy hack.

    The current co-owner of Rao’s, Frank Pellegrino Jr., told Bon Appetit in 2015 that the famous marinara sauce was created by his grandmother many years ago, and the sauce you buy in stores is the same recipe served in his restaurants. The ingredients are common, but correctly choosing the main ingredient—tomatoes—is important. Try to find San Marzano-style whole canned tomatoes, preferably from Italy. They are a little more expensive than typical canned tomatoes, but they will give you some great sauce.

    After 30 minutes of cooking, you’ll end up with about the same amount of sauce as in a large jar of the real thing. Your version will likely be just a little bit brighter and better than the bottled stuff, thanks to the fresh ingredients. But now you can eat it anytime you want, with no reservations, at a table you own.

    You might also like my #1 recipe of 2019, Texas Roadhouse Rolls.

    A recipe for Portuguese sweet bread inspired the soft rolls that became a big hit at Robert Tiara's Bakery & Restaurant in Honolulu, Hawaii in the 1950s. It wasn’t long before Robert changed the name of his thriving business to King’s Hawaiian, and in 1977 the company opened its first bakery on the mainland, in Torrance, California, to make the now-famous island sweet rolls sold in stores across the U.S.

    King’s Hawaiian Rolls are similar to Texas Roadhouse Rolls in that they are both pillowy, sweet white rolls, so it made sense to dig out my Texas Roadhouse Rolls clone recipe and use it as a starting point. These new rolls had to be slightly softer and sweeter, so I made some adjustments and added a little egg for color. And by baking the dough in a high-rimmed baking pan with 24 dough balls placed snugly together, I ended up with beautiful rolls that rose nicely to the occasion, forming a tear-apart loaf just like the original, but with clean ingredients, and without the dough conditioners found in the packaged rolls.

    Use these fluffy sweet rolls for sandwiches, sliders, or simply warmed up and slathered with soft European butter.

    This recipe was our #3 most popular in 2020. Check out the other four most unlocked recipes for the year: Rao's Homemade Marinara Sauce (#1), Olive Garden Lasagna Classico (#2), Pei Wei Better Orange Chicken (#4), Chipotle Mexican Grill Carnitas (#5).

    Braised and shredded pork shoulder is a staple of Mexican cuisine that Chipotle prepares with a simple blend of flavors, and a surprising ingredient you may not have expected: juniper berries. Once you track those down (they’re easy to find online), the berries are combined with thyme and bay leaves in a braising liquid that will transform your own pork roast into an easily shreddable thing of beauty in under 3 hours. Then you can use your freshly cloned carnitas on tacos, in burritos, or in a bowl over rice and beans just like they do in the restaurant.

    When picking your pork roast, try to find one without too much fat. If your roast has a thick cap of fat on it, trim off the excess. You want some fat in your braising liquid, but if the cap of fat is too thick, it may not fully render down and you’ll get chunks of fat in the shred.

    It’s often assumed that the pork butt is from the rear end of the pig, even though cuts from the back region already have a name: ham. The pork butt, also known as a Boston butt, is cut from the other end, the upper shoulder of the pig. It’s called a “butt” because in pre-Revolutionary War New England the roasts were stored and transported in barrels called “butts”, and the confusing name stuck.

    Braised Beef Pasta Menu Description: “Slow-simmered meat sauce with tender braised beef and Italian sausage, tossed with ruffled pappardelle pasta and a touch of alfredo sauce—just like Nonna’s recipe.”

    It’s a mistake to assume that a recipe posted to a restaurant chain’s website is the real recipe for the food served there. I’ve found this to be the case with many Olive Garden recipes, and this one is no exception. A widely circulated recipe that claims to duplicate the chain’s classic Bolognese actually originated on Olive Garden’s own website, and if you make that recipe you’ll be disappointed when the final product doesn’t even come close to the real deal. I won’t get into all the specifics of the things wrong with that recipe (too much wine, save some of that for drinking!), but at first glance it’s easy to see that a few important ingredients found in traditional Bolognese sauces are conspicuously missing, including milk, basil, lemon, and nutmeg.

    I incorporated all those missing ingredients into this new hack recipe, tweaked a few other things, and then tested several methods of braising the beef so that it comes out perfectly tender: covered, uncovered, and a combo. The technique I settled on was cooking the sauce covered for 2 hours, then uncovered for 1 additional hour so that the sauce reduces and the beef transforms into a fork-flakeable flavor bomb. Yes, it comes from Olive Garden, but this Bolognese is better than any I’ve had at restaurants that charge twice as much, like Rao’s where the meat is ground, not braised, and they hit you up for $30.

    As a side note, Olive Garden’s menu says the dish comes with ruffled pappardelle pasta, but it’s actually mafaldine, a narrower noodle with curly edges (shown in the top right corner of the photo). Pappardelle, which is the traditional pasta to serve with Bolognese, is a very wide noodle with straight edges, and it’s more familiar than mafaldine, so perhaps that’s why the menu fudges this fact. In the end, it doesn’t really matter which pasta you choose. Just know that a wide noodle works best. Even fettuccine is good here.

    For the little bit of alfredo sauce spooned into the middle of the dish I went with a premade bottled sauce to save time. You can also make this from scratch if you like (I’ve got a great hack for Olive Garden’s Alfredo Sauce), but it’s such a small amount that premade sauce in either a chilled tub from the deli section or in a bottle off the shelf works great here.

    This recipe was our #3 most popular in 2019. Check out the other four most unlocked recipes of the year: Texas Roadhouse Rolls (#1) KFC Extra Crispy Fried Chicken (#2), Pizzeria Uno Chicago Deep Dish Pizza (#4), Bush's Country Style Baked Beans (#5).

    And browse my other Olive Garden clone recipes here.

    Samuel Bath Thomas immigrated from England to New York City and opened his first bakery there in 1880. That is where Thomas created skillet bread that would one day become the famous muffins known for their craggy texture when split in half. This hack for Thomas’ English Muffins uses a special kneading process to give the muffins the "nooks and crannies" they are famous for, making craters in the finished bread to better hold on to melted butter and jam.

    I have seen several recipes that claim to re-create these muffins, but none produce the large air pockets that a proper clone requires, in addition to great flavor and a perfectly cooked interior. To ensure proper nooks and crannies and muffins that are cooked all the way through, I've included some important steps.

    The dough you'll make here is like a ciabatta dough in that it is very wet. So rather than kneading the dough, you stretch and fold it over several times on a well-oiled surface. Then, when the portioned-out dough has proofed on baking sheets for another 1½ to 2 hours, you par-bake the muffins.

    After baking, the muffins are cooked on a griddle or in a pan until dark brown on both sides, then they must cool. This is the hardest part. The muffins will be too soft to open for at least four hours, and now you have to fight off the temptation to eat one. It’s hard, I know. The muffins smell great and you’ve waited all this time, but resist for now and your patience will be rewarded.

    When the muffins have had their rest, split them with a fork and toast them as you would any English muffin.

    Check out all my top secret recipes for famous bread here.

    This 220-unit downscaled version of P.F. Chang’s China Bistro targets the lunch crowd with a smaller menu that features bento boxes, bowls, and small plates. The bestseller on the menu is this orange chicken, which I have to say is pretty damn good orange chicken. Obviously, a clone is needed for this one, stat.

    The name “Wei Better Orange Chicken” is a competitive callout to Panda Express's signature orange chicken, which is made with pre-breaded and frozen chicken. Pei Wei claims its orange chicken is prepared each day from scratch with chicken that is never frozen, so we’ll craft our clone the same way. But rather than assemble the dish in a wok over a high-flame fast stove like they do at the restaurant, we’ll prepare the sauce and chicken separately, then toss them with fresh orange wedges just before serving.

    By the way, this dish goes very well with white or brown rice, so don’t forget to make some.

    A requirement of any visit to Chicago is eating at least one slice of deep dish pizza in the city that perfected it. Deep dish pizza quickly became a Chicago staple after Ike Sewell and Ric Riccardo opened the first Pizzeria Uno in 1943 and served a hearty new style of pizza constructed in a high-rimmed cake pan. The yeast crust was tender and flakey, like a pastry, and the cheese was layered under the sauce so that it wouldn’t burn in a hot oven for the long cooking time.

    While researching a home hack of this now-iconic recipe, I discovered an unexpected technique that I hadn’t seen in other deep dish recipes. Employees told me the pizza crusts are partially cooked each morning to cut down on the wait time for customers. Before the restaurant opens each day, cooks press the dough into a pan and then sprinkle it with a little shredded cheese. The shells are then partially baked and set aside. Later, when an order comes in, the pizza is built into one of the par-baked crusts and finished off. This way customers get their food faster, and the tables turn over quicker.

    Copying that delicious, flakey crust was the task that took me the longest. After two weeks of baking, I finally settled on a formula that was a mash-up of yeast dough and pie crust and made a perfectly tender deep dish crust, with great flavor that exactly mimicked the original. If you like Uno, you will love this.

    Regarding the cheese: be sure your cheese is at room temperature, not cold, or it may not melt all the way through. Also, it’s best if you buy cheese by the block and shred it yourself. Pre-shredded cheese is dusted with cornstarch so that the shreds don’t stick together in the bag, and it won’t melt as smoothly as cheese you shred by hand.

    This recipe will make enough sauce for two pizzas. I just thought you should know that in case you get the urge to make another deep dish after this one disappears.

    This recipe was our #4 most popular in 2019. Check out the other four most unlocked recipes of the year: Texas Roadhouse Rolls (#1) KFC Extra Crispy Fried Chicken (#2), Olive Garden Braised Beef Bolognese (#3), Bush's Country Style Baked Beans (#5).

    To get their Extra Crispy Chicken so crispy KFC breads the chicken two times. This double breading gives the chicken its ultra craggy exterior and extra crunch, which is a different texture than the less crispy Original Recipe Chicken that’s breaded just once and pressure fried.

    As with my KFC Original Recipe hack, we must first brine the chicken to give it flavor and moisture all the way through, like the real thing, then the chicken is double breaded and deep fried until golden brown. KFC uses small chickens which cook faster, but small chickens can be hard to find. If your chicken parts are on the large side, they may not cook all the way through in the 12 to 15 minutes of frying I’m specifying here. To be sure your chicken is cooked, start frying with the thickest pieces, like the breasts, then park them in a 300-degree oven while you finish with the smaller pieces. This will keep the chicken warm and crispy, and more importantly, ensure that they are cooked perfectly all the way through.

    On my CMT show Top Secret Recipe I chatted with Winston Shelton, a long-time friend of KFC founder Harland Sanders. Winston saw the Colonel's handwritten secret recipe for the Original Recipe chicken, and he told me one of the secret ingredients is Tellicherry black pepper. It's a more expensive, better-tasting black pepper that comes from the Malabar coast in India, and you should use it here if you can find it. Winston pulled me aside and whispered this secret to me when he thought we were off-camera, but our microphones and very alert cameramen caught the whole thing, and we aired it.

    I first published this hack in Even More Top Secret Recipes, but recently applied some newly acquired secrets and tips to make this much-improved version of one of the most familiar fried chicken recipes in the world.

    This recipe was our #2 most popular in 2019. Check out the other four most unlocked recipes of the year: Texas Roadhouse Rolls (#1), Olive Garden Braised Beef Bolognese (#3), Pizzeria Uno Chicago Deep Dish Pizza (#4), Bush's Country Style Baked Beans (#5).

    In the Bush’s Beans commercials, Duke, the family golden retriever, wants to sell the secret family recipe, but the Bush family always stops him. The dog is based on the Bush family’s real-life golden retriever, and the campaign, which began in 1995, made Bush’s the big dog of the canned baked beans market practically overnight. Their confidential baked beans formula is considered one of the top 10 biggest recipe secrets in the U.S.

    Bush Brothers & Company had been canning a variety of fruits and vegetables for over 60 years when, in 1969, the company created canned baked beans using a cherished recipe from a family matriarch. Sales jumped from 10 thousand cases in the first year to over 100 thousand cases in 1970. And just one year later sales hit a million cases. Today Bush’s makes over 80 percent of the canned baked beans sold in the U.S., and the secret family recipe remains a top food secret, despite Duke’s attempts. A replica of the original recipe book—without the original recipe in it (drat!)—is on display at the company's visitor center in Chestnut Hill, Tennessee.

    I chose to hack the “Country Style” version of Bush’s Beans because I don’t think the Original flavor has enough, uh, flavor. Country Style is similar to Original, but richer, with more brown sugar. The recipe starts by soaking dry small white beans in a brine overnight. The salt in the water helps to soften the skins, but don’t soak them for more than 14 hours or the skins may begin to fall off.

    My first versions tasted great but lacked the deep brown color of the real Bush’s beans, which include caramel coloring—an ingredient that can be hard to find on its own. I eventually discovered that the “browning” sauce, Kitchen Bouquet, will add the dark caramel color needed to our home version of the beans so that they’ll look just like the real thing.

    This recipe was our #5 most popular in 2019. Check out the other four most unlocked recipes of the year: Texas Roadhouse Rolls (#1) KFC Extra Crispy Fried Chicken (#2), Olive Garden Braised Beef Bolognese (#3), Pizzeria Uno Chicago Deep Dish Pizza (#4).

    The first Auntie Anne's pretzel store opened in 1988 in the heart of pretzel country—a Pennsylvanian Amish farmers' market. Over 500 stores later, Auntie Anne's is one of the most requested secret clone recipes around, especially on the internet. Many of the copycat Auntie Anne's soft pretzel recipes passed around the Web require bread flour, and some use honey as a sweetener. But by studying the Auntie Anne's home pretzel-making kit in the secret underground laboratory, I've discovered a better solution for re-creating the delicious mall treats than any clone recipe out there. For the best quality dough, you just need all-purpose flour. And powdered sugar works great to perfectly sweeten the dough. Now you just have to decide if you want to make the more traditional salted pretzels, or the sweet cinnamon sugar-coated kind. Decisions, decisions.

    The talented chefs at Benihana cook food on hibachi grills with flair and charisma, treating the preparation like a tiny stage show. They juggle salt and pepper shakers, trim food with lightning speed, and flip the shrimp and mushrooms perfectly onto serving plates or into their tall chef's hat.

    One of the side dishes that everyone seems to love is the fried rice. At Benihana this dish is prepared by chefs with precooked rice on open hibachi grills, and is ordered a la cart to complement any Benihana entree, including Hibachi Steak and Chicken. I like when the rice is thrown onto the hot hibachi grill and seems to come alive as it sizzles and dances around like a bunch of little jumping beans. Okay, so I'm easily amused.

    This Benihana Japanese fried rice recipe will go well with just about any Japanese entree and can be partially prepared ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator until the rest of the meal is close to done.

    One of two pasta dishes currently on the pizza giant’s menu, the Meaty Marinara Pasta was first introduced in a 2008 April Fool’s publicity stunt when Pizza Hut claimed it was changing its name to “Pasta Hut.” No one fell for the prank but they did fall for the pasta, and that's why the Tuscani Creamy Chicken Alfredo Pasta and Meaty Marinara Pasta have been on the menu ever since. The sauce is the big secret here it's simple and classic, but customized to produce a marinara with that distinct Pizza Hut taste. And the recipe will make more than enough pasta to go around.

    The hack is an easy one. After browning the seasoned beef you add it to the sauce, simmer the sauce until thick, then spread it over one pound of rotini pasta in a baking dish in two layers so that every bite is filled with flavor. Sprinkle shredded mozzarella over the top and melt it until golden brown under your broiler. Boom! No one can resist. You rule.

    This simple and inexpensive meal will feed eight, and leftovers keep well in the fridge for a couple of days.

    Also check out my clone recipe for Pizza Hut Tuscani Creamy Chicken Alfredo Pasta.

    Since Panera Bread makes all its ingredients known, it's not hard to find out that there’s no chicken broth in the original recipe, yet every copycat recipe I located online calls for chicken broth, as well as other ingredients clearly not found in Panera's version. Unlike those other recipes, this hack uses the same or similar ingredients to those listed on the company’s website.

    One of the ingredients in the soup, according to the posted list, is yeast extract. This tasty ingredient adds an MSG-like savoriness to Panera’s soup, and we can duplicate it by using nutritional yeast—often called "nooch"—now found in many stores, including Whole Foods. A little bit of nooch will provide the umami deliciousness that replaces chicken broth or bouillon.

    Panera keeps its soup gluten-free by thickening it with a combination of rice flour and cornstarch, rather than wheat flour. I’ve included those ingredients as well so that your clone is similarly gluten-free. Use the steps below and in about an hour you’ll have 8 servings of a soup that is a culinary doppelganger to Panera Bread's all-time favorite soup, and at a mere fraction of the cost.

    Three things make Costco Blueberry Muffins special: they’re huge, they’re moist, and berries are bursting out of the top of each one. Now your home muffins can be just as special using a similar recipe and freshly unlocked tricks from our favorite big-box store.

    Obviously, you get huge muffins by using a huge muffin pan, so you’ll need a jumbo or “Texas-size” muffin pan if you want your muffins the same size as the originals. You can certainly make standard muffins with this batter in a standard-size muffin pan, but in this case, bigger is definitely better.

    To get muffins that are moist you’ll need oil. I noticed many muffin recipes use butter, but I found it made the muffins taste more like butter cake or pound cake than true muffins. Looking at the ingredients listed on the package of Kirkland muffins, you won’t find any butter in there. Just oil. For this hack, some of that oil comes from margarine (for a mild butter flavor and thicker batter), and the rest is vegetable oil.

    As for the blueberries, if you add them straight into the batter the juice frozen on the outside of the berries will streak your batter blue, so be sure to rinse the berries before you add them. And to make your muffins look as irresistible as those at Costco, we’ll use another one of their tasty tricks: press 4 blueberries into the batter in each cup just before the pan goes into the oven so that every baked muffin is sure to have several tantalizing berries popping out of the top.

    Over the years I've hacked a bunch of items from Chili's menu, including their Fajitas, Baby Back Ribs, Salsa, Chili Queso, Southwestern Eggrolls, Chicken Crispers, Boneless Wings, and more, but it wasn’t until recently that I got the chance to work on a hack for the chain’s award-winning Original Chili. Why it took so long, I have no idea.

    The chili served at Chili’s is a Texas-style con carne recipe, which traditionally means no beans and no tomato. You won’t find any beans in this recipe or chunks of tomato, but their chili does have a tomato base to boost flavor, so I’m adding that into the mix by including one 6-ounce can of tomato paste. As it turns out, that small can is just the right amount.

    The preparation technique is simple: brown the beef, drain off the fat, then add some of the fat back to the empty pan to sauté the onions and peppers in. When those are done, you add the beef back to the pan along with the remaining ingredients and simmer for 1½ hours. That will be just long enough to braise the beef and tenderize it, and to thicken the chili to a perfect consistency.

    When the chili’s done, top each serving with a cheddar/pepper Jack blend, and some crispy tortilla bits. Then pass out the spoons.

    Check here more of my Chili's copycat recipes.

    The Southern-themed chain famous for its gift shops filled with made-in-America products and delicious homestyle food is also known to have a particularly good meatloaf. This dish ranks high in popularity, right up there with the Chicken ‘n Dumplins and the Hash Brown Casserole, so a good hack is long overdue.

    Making meatloaf is easy. What’s hard is making it taste like the meatloaf at Cracker Barrel which is tender and juicy, and flavored with onion, green pepper, and tomato. I sought to turn out a moist and tender loaf of meat, and one that’s not dry and tough, but my first attempts were much too dense. I wasn’t happy about that, but my dog was thrilled.

    After playing around with the eggs-to-breadcrumbs-to-milk ratios and being careful to use gentle hands when combining everything and pressing it into the loaf pan, the final batch was a winner and I get to pass it along to you.

    It's best to use a meatloaf pan here which has an insert that lets the fat drip to the bottom, away from the meat. A regular loaf pan will still work, but you’ll want to pour off the fat in the pan before slicing.

    Satisfy your Cracker Barrel cravings with more of my copycat recipes here.

    Menu Description: “Two lightly fried parmesan-breaded chicken breasts are smothered with Olive Garden’s homemade marinara sauce and melted Italian cheeses. We serve our Chicken Parmigiana with a side of spaghetti for dinner.”

    Chicken parmigiana is a forever favorite, and it’s not a difficult dish to whip up at home. But for it to taste like the Olive Garden signature entree, we’ll need to take some very specific steps.

    Olive Garden’s chicken is salty and moist all the way through, so we must first start by brining the chicken. Give yourself an extra hour for this important marinating step. The marinara sauce used on the chicken is an Olive Garden specialty and no bottled sauce compares, so we’ll make our own from scratch using canned crushed tomatoes and the formula below.

    While the sauce cooks, filling your house with its intoxicating aroma, the chicken is breaded and browned. When the marinara is done, top the chicken with the sauce and mozzarella and stick it under your hot broiler until bubbling.

    Hopefully, everyone at your house is hungry, because the Olive Garden dinner portion is two chicken fillets, and this recipe will yield a total of four 2-piece servings. Add a small serving of spaghetti on the side, topped with more of the delicious sauce, and you'll have a perfect match to the restaurant plate.

    Can't get enough Olive Garden? Click here for more of my copycat recipes.

    There’s one copycat recipe for these famous biscuits that’s posted and shared more than any other, and it’s downright awful. The dough is formulated with self-rising flour, baking powder, powdered sugar, shortening, and buttermilk, and many complain that the recipe creates dough that’s much too loose and the resulting biscuits are a complete disaster. Yet there the recipe remains on blogs and boards all over the interweb for unsuspecting home cloners such as yourself to waste time on. But that won’t happen anymore, because I have made a good copycat Bojangles' buttermilk biscuits recipe that works the way it should, guaranteeing you’ll get amazing golden buttermilk biscuits that look and taste just like a trained Bojangles’ pro made them.

    In addition to the obvious overuse of buttermilk, the popular recipe I found online has many problems. The author gets it right when calling for self-rising flour, which is flour containing salt and a leavening agent (aka baking powder), but why would the copycat Bojangles biscuit recipe be designed to use self-rising flour and then add additional leaving? Well, it probably wouldn’t. Biscuits are job number 1 for self-rising flour, and the leavening in there is measured for that use, so there’s no need to add more. If you were planning to add your own leavening, you’d probably start with all-purpose flour, which has no leavening in it. And let's just be clear: baking powder tastes gross, so we want to add as little as possible, not more than necessary.

    It’s also important to handle the dough the same way that workers at Bojangles’ do. They make biscuits there every 20 minutes and there are plenty of YouTube videos showing the preparation technique. In a nutshell, the dough is mixed by hand (in the restaurant they use their hands because the quantity is so large, but for this recipe use a mixing spoon), then it’s folded over a few times on a floured countertop before it’s rolled out. This gentle handling of the dough prevents the gluten in the flour from toughening and adds layers, so your biscuits come out of the oven tender and flakey.

    For the best results, find White Lily flour. This self-rising flour is low in gluten and makes unbelievably fluffy biscuits. If you use another self-rising brand, you’ll still get great biscuits, but the gluten level will likely be higher, the biscuits will be tougher, and you’ll probably need more buttermilk. Head down to the Tidbits below for details on that.

    And I noticed another thing most copycat Bojangles biscuit recipes get wrong. For biscuits that are beautifully golden brown on the top and bottom, you’ll want to bake them on a silicone baking mat (or parchment paper) at 500 degrees F. Yes, 500 degrees. That may seem hot, but this high temp works well with self-rising flour, and in 12 to 15 minutes the biscuits will be perfectly browned.

    Counterintuitively, it’s the lower temperatures that end up burning the biscuits, while the higher temperature cooks them just right. At lower temps the biscuits must stay in the oven longer to cook through, which exposes the surfaces to more heat, and they end up too dark on the outside, especially the bottom. For even better results, if you have a convection setting on your oven, use that and set the temp to 475 degrees F. Your biscuits will look like they came straight from the drive-thru.


    Golden cornbread recipe - Recipes

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    Combine corn meal, flour, baking powder, sugar and salt until well mixed and no streaks remain.

    Beat egg well, add milk. Pour milk and egg mixture into the dry ingredients, stirring until mixed. Add melted butter or shortening.

    Bake in a well-greased shallow pan in oven or in heated muffin tins. Well seasoned cast iron muffin tins or frying pans work well. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean (about 20-25 minutes for muffins, depending upon size, and about 45 minutes for a frying pan. Baking time depends upon the kind of pans used, how hot the pan is when you start and your oven, so use your own good judgment.


    GOLDEN CORN BREAD OR MUFFINS