Traditional recipes

RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater

RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater

Joe Gracey was quite possibly the most passionate and original food writer you've never heard of. That's fair enough, because he wasn't really a food writer at all — he was a musician and music producer by trade. But he was also a guy who thought nothing of driving two hours for his favorite barbecue, made his own sausage, and once spent three days with his wife sampling boudin all over Cajun country — an adventure he chronicled on Letter from Graceyland, a blog he started in mid-2007, which he described as "Musings on food, cooking, travel, music, and life its own self from Joe Gracey, Jr., music producer, food and travel writer, cancer survivor, frequent contributor to Saveur magazine, musician, gourmand, and borderless bon vivant."

Born in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1950, Gracey (left, in Day of the Dead garb for a play) grew up to be a major figure in the lively and diverse Texas music scene. He played in a garage band as a kid and kept performing musically, off and on, for the rest of his life (bass was his main instrument). But his impact came in other areas: As a popular, deep-voiced DJ on Austin's KOKE-FM (all too appropriately named for that era) and the rock music columnist for the Austin American-Statesman, he was an early champion of "outlaw country" music and helped blur the line between country and rock (he is said to have been the first DJ to play his friend Willie Nelson on rock radio). As talent coordinator for the first season of Austin City Limits in 1976, he reunited Bob Wills' Texas Playboys, brought Ry Cooder and the great Tejano accordianist Flaco Jimenez together, and booked the TV debuts of performers like Clifton Chenier, Townes Van Zandt, and Asleep at the Wheel. (The American-Statesmen would later describe Gracey as "a seminal figure in the development of Austin's eclectic music scene.") (Photo courtesy of Bob Sherman)

Gracey, whose radio sign-off was, "Drink lots of water, stay off your feet, and come when you can," much later wrote in his blog that in those years, "Austin was basking in its new air of hipness — we elected a hippie mayor, we skinny-dipped at Barton Springs and Lake Travis, good Mexican weed was cheap, and the Pearl and Shiner and Lone Star beer was cold. Sir Doug Sahm called Austin 'Groover’s Paradise', and it was. It was a heady time to live here and I was riding the groove as hard as I could."

The ride took a dramatic detour for Gracey in 1978, when he learned that a bump he'd noticed on his tongue, and neglected, was malignant. He underwent a series of operations and radiation treatments and came out cured — but without a tongue or a larynx. He reminisced in his blog that on one occasion, he was walking around with big red squares on his jaws to guide the positioning of the radiation machines, and "when Stevie Ray Vaughn and Bobby Earl Smith [another Texas musician] saw me, they went upstairs at the Rome Inn and got red markers and drew big red boxes on their faces in solidarity with me after some asshole at the bar made fun of me."


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


RIP Joe Gracey, Texas Music Legend and Passionate Cook and Eater - Recipes

Remember a few years ago when the owner of a credit card payment processing company based in Seattle raised the minimum wage of his employees to $70,000/yr while taking a huge pay-cut himself and capitalists the world over, afraid of their beloved & apparently suuuuper delicate system collapsing from such madness, flipped out? 1 The BBC recently checked in with Gravity Payments and its owner Dan Price to see how things were going. Pretty damn well, as it turns out:

The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of.

&ldquoBefore the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team,&rdquo he says.

&ldquoAnd since the announcement &mdash and it&rsquos been only about four-and-a-half years &mdash we&rsquove had more than 40 babies.&rdquo

More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US&rsquos most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

&ldquoThere was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we&rsquove really seen the opposite,&rdquo Price says.

The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they&rsquove paid off debt.

When Price made the announcement about raising wages, two senior employees quit because they thought the junior employees would become lazy and the company would suffer. Spolier alert: didn&rsquot happen.

Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight.

&ldquoWhen money is not at the forefront of your mind when you&rsquore doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you,&rdquo she says.

Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They&rsquore under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

The thing about the increased number of babies is astounding. Some of that has to be demographic (employees getting older and entering prime family-starting years) but having a baby in the United States is expensive and that has to factor into many people&rsquos decision on whether to have a child, especially if it&rsquos a second kid or if you&rsquore a single parent.

But the most interesting observation is this one by Price equating the freedom of his employees to their capability:

&ldquoWe saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom,&rdquo Price says.

He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever.

Raising salaries didn&rsquot change people&rsquos motivation &mdash he says staff were already motivated to work hard &mdash but it increased what he calls their capability.

Employees that worry less about debt, healthcare, or where their next meal is coming from are happier, more productive employees. Imagine that.

Update: Although what he did in raising the salaries of his company&rsquos employees is commendable, Price himself is perhaps not the corporate role model that BBC article makes him out to be. From a 2016 piece about Price in Esquire:

In a TEDx Talk last fall, Price&rsquos ex-wife, Kristie, claimed he once &ldquogot mad at me for ignoring him and grabbed me and shook me&hellip He also threw me to the ground and got on top of me. He started punching me in the stomach and slapped me across the face.&rdquo (The video of the talk was never released, but Bloomberg Businessweek quoted it in a story about Price in December.) The suit brought by Lucas Price, his business partner and brother, was unrelated to Kristie&rsquos allegations. Lucas was seeking $26 million because, essentially, Dan had been a dick in their business dealings.

The rest of the piece corroborates that Price is in fact a dick who raised his employees&rsquo salaries partially because it was a good PR move. (via @adrianhon)

Have you noticed that when hardcore capitalists talk about plans to raise corporate taxes or re-institute a more progressive income tax scheme or regulate businesses, they seem deathly afraid that these changes are going to completely derail capitalism in America, as if capitalism were this super weak thing instead of one of the most powerfully unstoppable inventions that humans have ever created? Your great engine of change is indeed mighty! Have some confidence in your beliefs, man!↩


Watch the video: Heart in Texas (December 2021).