Traditional recipes

Peach Biscuit Brown Betty

Peach Biscuit Brown Betty

Peach Biscuit Brown Betty

The Peach Biscuit Brown Betty is a Loveless Café classic in Nashville, Tenn. Made with biscuits, rather than the traditional bread slices or crumbs, the biscuits give this dish just a little extra touch of that comfort food quality that we all crave.

So while this classic may seem familiar, know that the excitement is all in the taste. The homey sensibility of these welcome sweets makes comfort palpable; it’s what the Loveless Café is all about.

See all peach recipes.

Notes

*Note: You could use purchased baking powder biscuits for this recipe.

Ingredients

For the drunken caramel sauce

  • 1/3 Cup heavy cream
  • 1 Tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 small cinnamon stick
  • One 1-inch piece vanilla bean, split lengthwise in half
  • 1 Cup sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons light corn syrup
  • 1/4 Cup water
  • 1/4 Cup bourbon, whiskey, or dark rum

For the betty

  • 2/3 Cups packed light brown sugar
  • 3/4 Teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 Teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more for the baking dish
  • 4 Cups sliced, peeled peaches (about 2 1/2-3 pounds fresh peaches)
  • 2 Cups crumbled biscuits (about eight to ten 2-inch biscuits)*
  • 1/3 Cup freshly squeezed orange juice (about 1 orange)
  • 2 Tablespoons cinnamon sugar
  • Whipped cream, for serving (optional)

Servings4

Calories Per Serving1445

Folate equivalent (total)230µg57%

Riboflavin (B2)0.8mg46.8%


Easy Peach Cobbler Recipe with Biscuit Top

It’s hard to express our love of casual, homespun desserts. This peach cobbler recipe is a new favorite with it’s spiced peach filling and sweet biscuit top. Jump to the Easy Peach Cobbler Recipe or read on to see our tips for making it.

Cobblers, crisps and the like are perfect made in the summer when trees and bushes are brimming with sweet summer fruits. They are equally as impressive during the winter months, just use frozen fruits instead.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE: For another casual dessert, try our Easy Apple Crisp. We’ve even included a recipe video to show how to make it.


Homemade biscuits: A mouth-watering taste of the South

Some of y'all might not know the difference in angel, cathead, buttermilk or hot-rize biscuits and those things you pop out of a can. Well, bless your little hearts.

For those of us who have tasted hot from the oven homemade biscuits, the others can't compete. Sakes alive, they are heavenly with a pad of butter melting into the flaky crevices — and of course every good cook has their own recipe.

September is designated as National Biscuit Month, so it's time to try your hand at one of the many recipes for this soul anchor of Southern cooking.

Biscuit and topping recipes

Ingredients do matter. I think Southern flour makes better tasting biscuits than the national brands due to the wheat they use. They are lighter, don't brown as dark and have more of a biscuit taste, as opposed to a chewy bread taste. But if you've never tasted the difference, you'd never know the difference. Of course, I'm partial to Martha White flour as it is milled in Jackson. White Lily is another Southern favorite.

Breakfast with Page Jackson often includes homemade Hot-Rize Biscuits made from scratch. (Photo: Photograph courtesy of Darren Lykes)

Yes, I realize those bags of frozen biscuits at the grocery are pretty good, but make no mistake, they aren't the real deal. Making biscuits is becoming a lost art I suppose, with the low carb and gluten free regimens, and the convenience of warming something up or popping prepared foods in the oven.

Time was when biscuits were cooked by the pan full every morning and served until they were gone. Using leftovers in such recipes as the Loveless Motel's Peach Biscuit Brown Betty makes for mighty fine eating.

Biscuits continue to be on some Southern tables and menus. When it comes to breakfast sandwiches, even at fast food restaurants, it's biscuits — not wraps, crepes or Texas toast — that most people go for. Order them with egg and cheese, sausage, bacon, tenderloin, chicken, country fried steak or just plain with a dab of butter and your favorite jam or jelly.

They're good slathered with apple butter, to sop up sorghum or honey or split open and smothered with gravy. Then there's all the possibilities of gravies — sawmill, chocolate, brown, milk, tomato, or redeye, but we'll save that story for later.

You can add cheese, or herbs such as chives to your biscuits. Even cook them on top of pot pies, use them the next day in bread pudding, or stuff them with cream cheese and cinnamon sugar or savory pepperoni and mozzarella. You just can't go wrong with a biscuit.

If you're lucky enough to be served hot biscuits by a cook who doesn't need a recipe, like Page Jackson or Carol Ann Watson of the Browns Church community in Madison County, then no one will ever have to explain the difference to you again.

Their biscuits are so full of comfort that you'd swear they kissed them before putting them in the oven. These cooks are going to tell you there's nothing to it — and there isn't if you follow the directions until you've baked them long enough that you can tell by the feel of the dough if it's ready or not.

That's one of those things they don't teach in culinary school, and you can't quite master by watching your favorite TV cook. It takes a little practice if you're going to wing it, so until then pick a recipe and stick to it.

Is your mouth watering yet? And by the way, biscuits are good any time of day. Surely you've had breakfast food for supper — if not, it's time you do. I'm going back to the kitchen to peel more pears and get them on the stove.

Oh, there is nothing better on a buttered biscuit than homemade pear preserves. It's the smoothest of all fruits and there's a little taste of heaven in every bite.


CAN I USE ANOTHER BISCUIT MIX?

Sure! While this is a fresh peach cobbler with Bisquick, you can use any kind of biscuit mix.

One that comes to mind is Pioneer. Or you can even use a generic baking mix or your own biscuit mix.

Keep in mind I haven't tried it… But I'd wager to say you can even use a gluten-free baking mix to make this recipe.


Here is a savory monkey bread recipe that reimagines biscuits and gravy. This recipe is a hearty breakfast dish that is easy to share — great for an easy brunch dish to feed a crowd.

Stuff uncooked biscuits with delicious, melt-in-your-mouth-tender slow-cooked pork shoulder and discover a tasty hand pie recipe that’s a lovely take on a summer classic.


How to Make Grandma's Apple Brown Betty

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Mix together flour, oatmeal, sugars, and butter. Stir and blend well with a fork to make a crumb mixture. Divide mixture in 2 parts.

In 2 quart long baking pan, spread and pat down 1/2 of the crumb mixture.

Stir cinnamon and any fruits or nuts you are using into the applesauce. Pour this mixture over the crumbs in the baking dish.

Finish by carefully patting out the remaining half of the crumb mix on the applesauce.

Bake at 350 degrees for about 20-30 minutes. Crust is done when applesauce begins to bubble.


Pandowdy

A pandowdy is a sweet dessert with a fruit base made from one or several fruits and covered with a pastry or bread dough topping. Apple Pandowdy is the most common version of this dessert. When prepared, the dough is rolled out into a thin circular or square shape matching the shape of the deep baking dish containing the fruit. Nuts, such as sliced almonds, are often added to the Pandowdy dough.

There are two methods that can be used to bake the dough for the pandowdy. The dough may be baked separately from the fruit and then added during the baking time or it can be baked with the fruit. When baked with the fruit, the pandowdy is taken out of the oven after a brief baking period, then the dough is scored, and pressed into the fruit. The pandowdy is then placed back in the oven to finish baking.

If the dough is baked separately from the fruit, the fruit is mixed with brown sugar or molasses, cornstarch, and spices and then baked until tender and juicy. The baked dough topping is placed on top of the partially baked fruit mixture, pressed down slightly into the mixture and baked with the fruit until the dough is golden brown and the fruit is thick and bubbling. The dough becomes crisp and crumbly, adding a texture that enhances the fruit mixture. Very similar to a cobbler, grunt or slump, the deep-dished pandowdy can be served as a dessert or snack that is typically warm and topped with whipped cream or ice cream.


Evil Cake Lady

I tell ya, people. That Heavenly Cakes Bakethrough I participated in really killed my ability to bake AND blog. I am TRYING to get my mojo back, but as you might have noticed I'm not succeeding. I'm not beating myself up about it. but I do miss my weekly ritual of baking and blogging and reading your comments.

So I just found on my camera some photos of things I did actually bake over the summer, and that I really did intend on blogging over here but for some reason or another I never did. So let's do a quick photo-heavy roundup, shall we?

I think I mentioned in Joelf's bday post that I had extra biscuit lying around waiting to be used, right? Well here they are. I baked them in my toaster oven while Joelf's cake baked in the oven. I decided to use the biscuits to make a brown betty, based on recipes found in Rustic Fruit Desserts.

I took some peaches, cherries and apricots, macerated them in a little sugar, and poured them into a 9 inch deep dish pie plate.

I crumbled the biscuit over the top and added pats of butter.

And ate it with some whipped cream.

It was good, not awesome, and that is probably why I didn't blog about it. The biscuit, while having great crunchy texture, doesn't have much favor on it's own and that was a problem. I debated putting the biscuit on the bottom of the pie plate and the fruit on top, and I think there's something intriguing about that idea I might revisit next summer. If any of you want to experiment with that, please do comment and let me know how it went.

I also baked the Upside-Down Sweet Cherry Cake from Rustic Fruit Desserts and it was delicious! There's orange zest and cinnamon in the yellow cake batter that plays well with the sweet cherries. I think I baked it when friends came to visit it was a darn good cake. I bought more cherries fully intending to make it again but it never happened. Sadly, I have one super lame pic of the cake: the cherries in a dark kitchen lined up in the pan, waiting to be covered with a thick luscious batter.

I also baked Kate Coldrick's brownie/chocolate chip cookie cake thingy, and it was so super sweet. I also undercooked the brownie portion and wished in general I had stopped after making the chocolate chip cookie part.

But it does look pretty, doesn't it.

Well friends, that's it for now. I will try and be a better blogger as the holidays are coming and baking will probably happen more often now. Cross your fingers!


My Favorite Biscuit Recipe

Yeah, I know biscuits aren’t meat but stay with me for a little while….

When I moved to the South I knew biscuits were something I needed to learn how to make. I had made a few here and there in the past but they were never good so after trying about a half dozen different recipes I stumbled upon one from a restaurant in Brooklyn called Pies-n-Thighs. Ultimately I wanted a biscuit that would hold up to being used kind of like a bun. I wanted something you could use for a fried chicken biscuit and it would still hold up.

These biscuits aren’t necessarily flaky or soft but they aren’t hard, tough biscuits either. They end up super buttery (should be, there is 3 sticks of butter in them), they rise nicely, and are sturdy enough to hold up to whatever you want to top them with. If you just want to put some butter and jam on them they are great that way as well. So if you are looking for an easy biscuit recipe that turns out a great result check this one out:

Like I said earlier, these biscuits can stand on their own or they are great to use as a bun. The end up about 3+ inches tall so they are definitely big enough to split in half. Here is my favorite application:

Bacon, Egg, and Cheese Biscuit

Just fry up some bacon (the Kurobuta bacon from Snake River Farms is my favorite), fry an egg, and add a couple slices of cheddar cheese. You can even throw some lettuce and tomato and have a BLT biscuit.

A couple more ideas of what to do with this great biscuit recipe:

  • A fried chicken breast goes great on these biscuits and my favorite recipe to use for that is this Chick-Fil-A knockoff from Serious Eats.
  • Fry up some sausage and make a nice sausage gravy for some excellent biscuits and gravy
  • In a pinch I have used these as hamburger buns and they are great for that. The biscuit does a nice job of soaking up the juice from the burger. Go somewhat light on the toppings and you will be fine.
  • Cut up some strawberries, cook them with a bit of sugar, whip up some cream and you have a great Strawberry Shortcake
  • Cook up some chicken pot pie filling, cut the biscuits in half, and throw them on top
  • A biscuit brown betty
  • And the list goes on…

Give this biscuit recipe a shot the next time you make biscuits and I think you will like it too.


My Favorite Biscuit Recipe

Yeah, I know biscuits aren’t meat but stay with me for a little while….

When I moved to the South I knew biscuits were something I needed to learn how to make. I had made a few here and there in the past but they were never good so after trying about a half dozen different recipes I stumbled upon one from a restaurant in Brooklyn called Pies-n-Thighs. Ultimately I wanted a biscuit that would hold up to being used kind of like a bun. I wanted something you could use for a fried chicken biscuit and it would still hold up.

These biscuits aren’t necessarily flaky or soft but they aren’t hard, tough biscuits either. They end up super buttery (should be, there is 3 sticks of butter in them), they rise nicely, and are sturdy enough to hold up to whatever you want to top them with. If you just want to put some butter and jam on them they are great that way as well. So if you are looking for an easy biscuit recipe that turns out a great result check the recipe below.

Like I said earlier, these biscuits can stand on their own or they are great to use as a bun. The end up about 3+ inches tall so they are definitely big enough to split in half. Here is my favorite application:

Bacon, Egg, and Cheese Biscuit

Just fry up some bacon (the Kurobuta bacon from Snake River Farms is my favorite), fry an egg, and add a couple slices of cheddar cheese. You can even throw some lettuce and tomato and have a BLT biscuit.

A couple more ideas of what to do with this great biscuit recipe:

  • A fried chicken breast goes great on these biscuits and my favorite recipe to use for that is this Chick-Fil-A knockoff from Serious Eats.
  • Fry up some sausage and make a nice sausage gravy for some excellent biscuits and gravy
  • In a pinch I have used these as hamburger buns and they are great for that. The biscuit does a nice job of soaking up the juice from the burger. Go somewhat light on the toppings and you will be fine.
  • Cut up some strawberries, cook them with a bit of sugar, whip up some cream and you have a great Strawberry Shortcake
  • Cook up some chicken pot pie filling, cut the biscuits in half, and throw them on top
  • A biscuit brown betty
  • And the list goes on…

Give this biscuit recipe a shot the next time you make biscuits and I think you will like it too.


Watch the video: Ανάποδη τάρτα ροδάκινο με μπισκότο βρώμης. Ελένη 1705 AlphaTv (December 2021).