Traditional recipes

Smoked Ricotta Gnudi

Smoked Ricotta Gnudi

The secret to this gnudi recipe is a yeast ingredient that helps to thicken the dairy, and, of course, the smoking of the cheese.

Notes

*Activa YG is otherwise known as "meat glue," and is a natural enzyme that has the ability to glue proteins together. It is available for purchase The Modernist Pantry. While chef Riesenberger likes to use it in his gnudi, you can substitute it with rice flour or regular flour.

Ingredients

  • 1 Pound sheep's milk ricotta
  • 5 Tablespoons Activa YG*
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1/4 Cup grated Parmesan, plus extra for garnish
  • 1/4 Cup mascarpone
  • 1 Teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 Cup crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 Cup white wine
  • 1/4 Cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 Ounces yellow wax beans
  • 2 Tablespoons minced shallot
  • 1 fennel bulb, chopped with tops
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped tarragon
  • Rice flour, for dusting
  • Olive oil, as needed

    • 16 ounces ricotta (about 2 cups)
    • 1 large egg, beaten to blend
    • 1 large egg yolk, beaten to blend
    • 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
    • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan or Grana Padano plus more
    • 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt plus more
    • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour plus more
    • 3 cups Quick Pomodoro Sauce
    1. Mix ricotta, egg, egg yolk, pepper, 1/2 cup Parmesan, and 1/2 teaspoons salt in a large bowl until well combined. Add 1/2 cup flour stir just until combined and mixture forms a ball (mixture will be soft and moist with some bits of ricotta remaining add more flour by the tablespoonful if it feels wet).
    2. Dust a rimmed baking sheet generously with flour. Using 2 large soup spoons, shape heaping tablespoonfuls of dough into football shapes place on baking sheet and dust with more flour (you should have 30).
    3. Cook gnudi in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until cooked through and tender, 5-6 minutes (gnudi will quickly float to surface continue cooking or gnudi will be gummy in the center).
    4. Using a slotted spoon, divide gnudi among bowls. Top with Quick Pomodoro Sauce and more Parmesan.

    Ricotta gnudi with sage butter

    Line a sieve with a piece of muslin or a new J-cloth and place over a bowl. Tip the ricotta into the cloth, gently gather up the ends and secure with an elastic band. Leave the ricotta to drain for 4 hrs.

    Transfer the drained ricotta to a clean bowl. Beat in the hard cheese, egg yolk, a good grating of nutmeg, then season well. Tip the semolina into a baking dish or large plastic container. Wet your hands, dip them in the semolina and, working quickly, scoop 1 heaped tsp of the ricotta mix into your hands and gently roll into a ball (don’t worry if it’s not perfect). Place the ball in the semolina dish and roll around so that it is totally covered. Pick it up and roll between the palms of your hands to create a smooth ball, then pop back into the semolina. Continue with the rest of the mixture. You should make about 24 balls. Once all the balls are formed and are sitting in the semolina, cover loosely with baking parchment (not cling film), put the dish in the fridge and leave to chill for at least 12 hrs, although 24 hrs is better – this is so the balls of ricotta form a skin around the outside.

    When ready to serve, bring a large pan of salted water to the boil. Turn down to a simmer and lower in half the gnudi. Cook gently for 2-3 mins – they’re ready when they float to the top – then scoop out with a slotted spoon and transfer to a sieve. Repeat with the remaining gnudi. Slowly melt the butter in a small frying pan. Add the sage leaves, making sure they don’t overlap, and let them sizzle until crisp. Transfer to a plate lined with kitchen paper. If the butter has turned a nutty brown, remove from the heat if not, continue to bubble until lightly browned. Divide the gnudi between warmed plates, drizzle over the browned butter, top with the sage and pine nuts, and serve with grated cheese, black pepper and a rocket & red onion salad.


    Ricotta Gnudi

    For gnudi: Put a large pot of water over high heat. Season it with salt until it tastes like the sea. In a medium mixing bowl, place ricotta, Parmesan, one whole egg, one egg yolk, zest of one lemon chopped fine, pinch of nutmeg, 1 teaspoon salt and the chives. Mix well. Add the flour, little by little. You might not need the entire ½ cup. Do not overmix once the flour is in. Place about a cup of semolina in a second mixing bowl. Using a cookie scooper, scoop the gnudi dough into the semolina. Roll each scoop with your hands to form balls. Once all the gnudi is formed, drop them into the boiling water. They should take about 4 minutes to cook.

    For sauce: In a large saute pan, place 2 ounces butter, squash and sage over medium-high heat. Cook until butter turns a brownish color and smells nutty. Remove sage from pan.

    To finish: When the pasta is cooked, add it to the pan with ¼ cup of the pasta water. Season with salt (if needed) and juice of one lemon. Toss the arugula through at the very end. Plate it and garnish with Parmesan and fresh crushed pepper.


    Preparation

    Step 1

    Mix ricotta, egg, egg yolk, pepper, 1/2 cup Parmesan, and 1/2 teaspoons salt in a large bowl until well combined. Add 1/2 cup flour stir just until combined and mixture forms a ball (mixture will be soft and moist with some bits of ricotta remaining add more flour by the tablespoonful if it feels wet).

    Step 2

    Dust a rimmed baking sheet generously with flour. Using 2 large soup spoons, shape heaping tablespoonfuls of dough into football shapes place on baking sheet and dust with more flour (you should have 30).

    Step 3

    Cook gnudi in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until cooked through and tender, 5-6 minutes (gnudi will quickly float to surface continue cooking or gnudi will be gummy in the center).

    Step 4

    Using a slotted spoon, divide gnudi among bowls. Top with Quick Pomodoro Sauce and more Parmesan.

    How would you rate Ricotta Gnudi with Pomodoro Sauce?

    Loved the gnudi but needed well over 2 cups of flour to make them workable. They were delicious so Iɽ make them again but the recipe was definitely off.

    Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

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    Smoked Ricotta Gnudi - Recipes

    Soft, pillowy ricotta balls with wild garlic and burnt butter. The cousin of gnocchi but using ricotta instead of potato. As ricotta is the main man in this recipe it’s worth hunting down the best ricotta you can find. As we are in the early days of the wild garlic season, I really encourage you to get out and about to find it locally. This recipe calls for quite a lot of fresh wild garlic, if you are unable to pick your own you can mix it up with fresh spinach too.

    This recipe serves two as a main or four as a starter but can easily be scaled up. Gnudi can be frozen once boiled for up to two months.

    85g blanched, well drained and finely chopped wild garlic

    40g finely grated parmesan

    For the sauce

    20g fresh wild garlic leaves

    Start by mixing ricotta, wild garlic, parmesan, nutmeg, egg yolk, salt and pepper in a bowl. The amount of flour you need to add depends on how well drained your blanched wild garlic is but start with adding 1-2 table spoons of flour and mix well, you will notice when you can just about form a little ball. If still too to lose add another tablespoon of flour at a time.

    Cover a sheet pan or plate with a thick layer of semolina and take a bowl and fill with semolina. Take some of the mixture, about a tablespoon and roll to a rough ball and transfer it to the semolina bowl, cover with semolina and roll into a ball. The semolina makes it less sticky and easy to roll. Transfer to the tray and leave whilst you roll the remaining gnudi.

    To cook the gnudi, bring a large pot of salted water to the boil, add gnudi and cook until the float to the surface, this should take about 5-7 minutes. Do not overcrowd the pot, it’s better to cook gnudi in batches if needed. Drain well on kitchen towel.

    Meanwhile, add the butter to a pan on medium heat, once you see the butter starting to change colour add whole garlic cloves and lemon peel, cook for another minute until adding fresh wild garlic leaves and gnudi, season with salt and pepper. Coat gnudi in the butter sauce and transfer to a serving dish. As you cook the wild garlic leaves in the butter, they will turn crispy. Spoon the butter sauce over the gnudi, add the crispy leaves and grate good quality parmesan over the top.


    The Scoop on Scooping

    The texture of cooked gnudi can mostly be predicted by the consistency of the raw dough. A mixture that is firm enough to be rolled into ropes and cut into pieces (like gnocchi dough) tends to contain more binder and cook up rather dense. This dough, which is just cohesive enough to scoop and roll into balls, cooks up light and pillowy.

    Case in point: I made a beautifully workable dough with a pair of egg whites (more valuable than yolks for their preponderance of binding proteins) and a little more than ½ cup of flour. I rolled it into tidy ropes and cut the ropes into small pieces as I would gnocchi&mdashthe shaping approach I&rsquod seen in several recipes. But the cooked dumplings were dense and tight.

    I could have kept fiddling with the ratios, but instead I solicited ideas from Lydia Reichert, a friend of mine who is the former chef at Sycamore in Newton, Massachusetts. She offered a clutch suggestion: Instead of making a dough that&rsquos firm enough to roll, make one that&rsquos just cohesive enough to scoop and roll into rounds (see &ldquoThe Scoop on Scooping&rdquo).

    To do that, I had to cut back on some of the flour without removing so much starch that the dough became sticky. And as it turned out, that was a perfect job for the bread crumbs I&rsquod seen in some gnudi recipes: Just 1 tablespoon of conventional crumbs in place of an equal amount of flour produced a light but cohesive dough and noticeably airier gnudi, since they made the dough heterogeneous, much as they would in a meatball mixture. The results were even better with panko these coarser crumbs are more absorbent and made the raw dough easier to handle.

    Our quick sauce combines bright fresh tomatoes with rich browned butter.


    What is the difference between Gnudi and Gnocchi?

    Gnudi are lighter little balls of ricotta cheese, “pillowy” and soft, delicate in flavour. Whiles gnocchi , made from potatoes or even ricotta are tougher, slightly chewer, due to the flour in the dough.

    Can I eat plain ricotta?

    Ricotta cheese is one of the most versatile ingredients in the kitchen. I would say is a creamy carrier of flavour. It can be used plain, in savoury dishes and in sweet dishes. From a base for a roasted tomato bruschetta to a scrummy cheesecake, or even just mixed with seasonal fruit and honey for breakfast.

    Why not make a nutella mouse using ricotta cheese, for low fat alternative!


    Ricotta Gnudi With Buttery Peas

    "This recipe will make it look like you have spent the day cooking but really, you could pretty much make it in the ad breaks of your favorite soap opera. I have used mushy, buttery peas to accompany the gnudi, but ricotta is such a great vehicle for other flavors that you could use just about any pasta sauce." &mdashJBF Award winner Nick Haddow

    Ingredients

    • 12 1/2 ounces fresh ricotta
    • 1 ounce grated hard cheese, such as Parmesan or similar grana-style cheese
    • 1 egg yolk
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
    • 8 ounces fine semolina, plus extra for dusting

    Buttery Peas:

    • 3 1/2 ounces salted butter
    • 12 sage leaves
    • 1 pound 2 ounces frozen peas
    • 2 tablespoons pure cream (35% fat)
    • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

    Method

    To make the gnudi, mix the ricotta, grated cheese, egg yolk, and nutmeg in a medium-sized bowl. Tip the semolina into a shallow baking dish and dust a plate with a little extra semolina. Working quickly with damp hands, roll a tablespoon of the ricotta mixture in your hands to form a rough ball. Roll it in the semolina and then form into a smooth ball, about the size of a golf ball. Place on the plate and continue until all of the ricotta mixture is used &ndash you should end up with about 12 dumplings. Cover the gnudi with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for an hour to firm up.

    Melt the butter with the sage leaves in a heavy-based frying pan over medium heat. Remove from the heat just as the butter is starting to brown.

    Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil and add the frozen peas. Simmer for 5 minutes until tender. Remove the peas with a slotted spoon and transfer to a food processor with the cream and lemon juice. Process until almost smooth. Add to the melted butter and stir to combine. Pour into a serving dish and set aside.

    Bring the water to the boil again, then reduce to a simmer. Working in 2 or 3 batches, add the gnudi and cook for about 3 minutes, or until they float to the top. Remove with a slotted spoon, drain well and serve on top of the warmed buttery peas.

    Recipe excerpted with permission from Milk. Made. by Nick Haddow, published by Hardie Grant Books, September 2016. Photography credit: Alan Benson.


    These Recipes Prove That Gnudi And Gnocchi Are Always Delicious

    In this life, we get to eat far too few things that can be described as "cloud-like." We've got marshmallows, meringues and the occasional dollop of whipped cream. Don't worry, we've figured out two more, and they're not even dessert: gnocchi and gnudi.

    These two different styles of Italian dumplings are the perfect comfort food. They're filling without feeling heavy and are nearly always blanketed in a sauce that deserves sopping up. These delicious cousins are made similarly, shaped similarly and served similarly -- so, what's the difference?

    Originally, if the main ingredient was potato, we called it gnocchi. But as with all culinary evolutions, things have begun to deviate from strict definition. In Italian, gnudi roughly translates to 'nude,' which means you should think of gnudi as a naked ravioli -- filling only. That's why gnudi's main ingredient is usually ricotta. We've found gnudi to be a bit more forgiving to make at home, but neither gnudi or gnocchi are rocket science and just require a little practice.

    You hear that? Just a little practice and linguistic forgiveness earns you a cloud-like dinner.


    Watch the video: Tomato u0026 Ricotta Bruschetta. Gennaro Contaldo (October 2021).