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Why Are Peanuts and Cracker Jack Baseball Staples?

Why Are Peanuts and Cracker Jack Baseball Staples?

This duo is almost as old as the game itself

There are few foods that are more synonymous with baseball.

So let’s say, hypothetically, that someone is taking you out to the ball tame. If there are two foodstuffs that you would imagine yourself requesting to snack on during the game, what do you suppose they’d be? Peanuts and Cracker Jack, surely.

In all seriousness, though, why are peanuts and Cracker Jack baseball staples? It’s not just the fact that they’re mentioned in the song (which was written all the way back in 1908, by the way); there’s really a connection here.

First, peanuts. Believe it or not, it wasn’t until the 1930s that peanuts became as common a food as they are today, but in the late 1800s the USDA made a huge push to get more people to cultivate peanuts because they’re so nutrient-dense. So it comes as no surprise that a part of that push was the sale of peanuts at baseball games, where they can be snacked on throughout the nine innings. They also appeared at other venues where people were hanging around and drinking beer at around the turn of the century, like bars.

As for Cracker Jack, this snack was first invented in 1896 and started catching on at the turn of the century. Its producers most likely also found that it made a great snack for munching on during a baseball game, so they probably made a push to get it into ballparks. And the popularity of “Take Me Out to The Ballgame” played no small role in providing the brand with free publicity and helping to cement both peanuts’ and Cracker Jack’s ubiquity at baseball games.


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Schlepping the Peanuts and Cracker Jack (and a Lot of Other Stuff)

The green duffel bag is always within a few feet of Hideki Okajima’s locker. Okajima, a reliever for the Boston Red Sox, has a luggage tag with 37, his uniform number, attached to it. The words “Take to the ballpark” are taped to the bag, too.

What precious items are in the bag that Okajima protects so zealously? There are sunflower seeds, gum, candy, bottles of water, caffeinated drinks and anything else Okajima’s fellow relievers may request to sip or munch on during a game.

It is traditional for relievers with the least service time on a major league team to stock and handle the bullpen bag. What makes Okajima different from the typical rookie who receives the assignment is that he pitched 11 seasons in Japan. What also makes Okajima’s appointment notable is how seriously he treats the tedious job.

“I was told that it was my responsibility to make sure there are enough supplies in the bag,” Okajima said through an interpreter. “That’s why I make sure I’ve got enough.”

When Okajima arrived at the clubhouse in Baltimore last week, the first thing he did was examine the contents of a bag that makes every day seem like Halloween. Then he flashed 10 fingers at a clubhouse attendant, a sign that he needed 10 bags of seeds. He replaced warm cans of Red Bull with cold ones. He replenished the bag before slipping into his uniform.

Okajima said he experienced handling the goody bag when pitching with the Yomiuri Giants. In Japan, the youngest reliever is responsible for the bag, not the pitcher with the least service time. Since Okajima, 31, made his debut at age 19, he was the bag man for a while.

“I had many veteran pitchers in front of me,” Okajima said. “So I did a lot of running around.”


Watch the video: Buy me some peanuts u0026 Cracker Jacks (December 2021).