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America’s 10 Most Sugary Cereals Slideshow

America’s 10 Most Sugary Cereals Slideshow

We camped out in the cereal aisle and found the ones most loaded with sugar

10) Kellogg’s Froot Loops

41 percent sugar (14.5 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.6 packets of sugar

Toucan Sam and his loops of "froot" debuted in 1962 and have been a breakfast and pop culture mainstay ever since. They’re also loaded with sugar, and coated with a layer of it.

9) Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch’s Crunch Berries

42 percent sugar (14.8 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.7 packets of sugar


One can only presume in all of his nautical travels that the Cap’n has encountered a number of sights us land-bound mortals will never see, such as an infinite supply of Crunch Berries. Introduced in 1967, this cereal was the first of many permutations of the Cap’n Crunch cartel.

8) Kellogg’s Apple Jacks

43 percent sugar (15 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.8 packets of sugar


After debuting in 1965 as Apple O’s, this "fruit"-based cereal took its current name in 1971. It shares its name with an apple-based liquor, an odd choice for a children’s cereal.

7) (Tie) Quaker Oats Oh!s

44 percent sugar (15.6 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.9 packets of sugar


This cereal replaced the apostrophe with an exclamation point when it debuted in the 1980s, a move that looks fine on the box but doesn’t exactly translate to grocery lists.

7) (Tie) Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch Original

44 percent sugar (15.6 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.9 packets of sugar


The Cap’n (formally known as Horatio Magellan Crunch) launched his maiden voyage to our kitchen cabinets in 1963. It’s difficult to navigate the vast ocean of breakfast cereals without seeing the Cap’n’s influence; it has more spin-offs than most other popular brands.

5) Kellogg’s Smorz

45 percent sugar (15.7 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.9 packets of sugar


This is one of the newer additions to the breakfast cereal lexicon (introduced in 2003) and it's unabashedly sugary: it essentially calls itself a dessert you put milk on and feed your children in the morning. Amen to truth in advertising.

4) Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch’s OOPS! All Berries

47 percent sugar (16.4 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.1 packets of sugar


Introduced in 1997, All Berries finally freed us from the dark ages when one had to actually take the time to pour a bowl of Crunch Berries and remove all those unwanted, non-berry pieces. Say what you will about his nutritional knowledge; the Cap’n sure knows how to get inside kids’ heads.

3) Kellogg’s Froot Loops Marshmallow

48 percent sugar (16.9 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.2 packets of sugar


It seems one of the go-to moves in the cereal industry is to take your existing product and add marshmallows to it. Marshmallows are to prepackaged cereals as bacon is to everything else.

2) Post Golden Crisp

52 percent sugar (18.1 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.5 packets of sugar


This cereal hit the market as Sugar Crisp in 1949 and has since changed its name (but not its sugar content). However, the mascot still goes by the name Sugar Bear.

1) Kellogg’s Honey Smacks

55 percent sugar (19.4 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.9 packets of sugar


Here’s the kingpin of granulated goodness. This product was introduced in 1953 under the name Sugar Smacks, then it was renamed Honey Smacks, then just Smacks and now, it’s back to Honey Smacks. You could probably call them almost anything; kids "dig 'em" for the taste, not the name. With the equivalent of nearly five packets of sugar and two Krispy Kreme glazed donuts per 35-ounce serving, it's the most sugary cereal currently on the market.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.


10 Best Healthy Cereals to Enjoy for Breakfast, According to Dietitians

These low-sugar cereals are high in fiber and pack some protein.

Nothing makes us more nostalgic of our childhoods like enjoying a bowl of candy-colored cereal with cold milk. But as we now know as adults, many cereals we enjoyed as kids, whether it's Fruit Loops or Captain Crunch, are laced with sugar and refined carbs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of crunchy, whole grain cereal options you can enjoy for your everyday breakfast, without cashing in too much of the sweet stuff. Like all things with food and nutrition, ensuring you're enjoying a healthy cereal comes down to reading the nutrition label and ingredient list. Here&rsquos what you should look for.

How to shop for healthy cereal

Naturally, the first place you should look on the nutrition label is the carbs category, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It - Taking You from Label to Table. &ldquoThese days, popular diets bash carbs, so people think if this is a high number, they shouldn&rsquot have it,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut really, you need to think about portion size and the type of carb.&rdquo

- Look for 100 percent whole grains. The best kind of carbohydrate for your cereal is whole grains&mdashwhich should take the first spot on the ingredient list. Look for words like 100 percent whole wheat, wheat bran, or another variety like rye. &ldquo[These grains] help keep us full, while providing lots of minerals and vitamins, like B vitamins,&rdquo Taub-Dix says.

You don&rsquot necessarily need a ton of fat in your cereal, as that macronutrient will come from other sources throughout your day. But if you want to make your bowl more satiating, Taub-Dix suggests adding some nuts. They add some healthy fats and a bit more crunch, too.

- Aim for five grams of fiber per serving. The other major item you should check for is fiber. &ldquoFiber is really important to look for in cereal, because we don&rsquot get enough as it is and whole-grain cereal is a great way to get it in the morning,&rdquo Taub-Dix says. Choose brands with at least five grams of fiber in each serving, with a mix of soluble (which can help decrease the risk of disease, stabilize blood sugar, and lower cholesterol) and insoluble (the type that keeps your digestive system moving).

Kristen Smith, RD, Atlanta-based dietitian, founder of 360 Degree Family Nutrition and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says adults should get 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

- Opt for brands with five grams or less of sugar per serving. On the flip side of much-needed fiber, you have unnecessary sugar. &ldquoA good thing to know is that when there&rsquos a lot of added sugar, there will also be a high carbohydrate number,&rdquo says Taub-Dix. The closer the sugar number is to the carb number on the nutrition label, the more sweet stuff and less grains there are in the box. So keep sugar under control by choosing brands with about five grams or less of sugar per serving.

-Be sure there's protein. Smith says to go for a bowl with three to five grams of the muscle-building macronutrient.

For a hearty bowl of grains, check out this list of the best healthy cereals.