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Spaghetti with rocket, ham and lemon recipe

Spaghetti with rocket, ham and lemon recipe

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  • Ingredients
  • Pasta

We had some rocket lurking in the salad drawer which needed using soon and I didn't fancy a salad for dinner but was really craving some pasta. Added some chilli for a kick and some lemon for some zesty freshness and set it all off with garlic, olive oil and freshly grated Parmesan.


Kent, England, UK

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 200g spaghetti
  • extra virgin olive oil, as needed
  • 2 slices Yorkshire ham, chopped
  • 1 red chilli, seeded and finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, grated or crushed
  • 2 generous handfuls rocket
  • salt and black pepper to taste
  • zest from 1 lemon
  • freshly grated Parmesan cheese

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:11min ›Ready in:21min

  1. Cook the spaghetti in salted boiling water until al dente as instructed on the packet.
  2. Meanwhile, heat a small saucepan or frying pan with a little olive oil. Add the ham and cook gently for a minute until it has started to colour. Add the chilli and garlic and cook for another minute. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  3. Drain the pasta then mix with the ham mixture. Add the rocket and toss well. Season well and add enough olive oil to take the dryness away but don't drench it. Just a light coating.
  4. Plate up and sprinkle over the lemon zest and cheese. Serve.

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Spaghetti With Lemon, Garlic and Breadcrumbs

I always relish an opportunity to use up ingredients that are past their best. The thing to do is make breadcrumbs with stale bread whenever it's to hand. Stash the breadcrumbs in airtight bags in the deep freeze and use whenever needed, without thawing first. I am not totally old-school, though: I don't grate my stale bread to make breadcrumbs, but blitz it in the food processor. As a final note on the breadcrumbs, may I suggest you measure in volume not weight? Every batch of breadcrumbs seems to differ in density so much that when I cook with them I go by cup measures, but I have given the weight as well for those who feel reassured by that. How much or little you use here doesn't matter enormously, though. It's just not that kind of recipe.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

I always relish an opportunity to use up ingredients that are past their best. The thing to do is make breadcrumbs with stale bread whenever it's to hand. Stash the breadcrumbs in airtight bags in the deep freeze and use whenever needed, without thawing first. I am not totally old-school, though: I don't grate my stale bread to make breadcrumbs, but blitz it in the food processor. As a final note on the breadcrumbs, may I suggest you measure in volume not weight? Every batch of breadcrumbs seems to differ in density so much that when I cook with them I go by cup measures, but I have given the weight as well for those who feel reassured by that. How much or little you use here doesn't matter enormously, though. It's just not that kind of recipe.


Wholewheat Pasta with Tuna, Lemon & Rocket Recipe

Calories are a measure of the amount of energy in food and drink. Your weight depends on the balance between how much energy you consume and how much energy you use up. If you eat or drink more than you use you can gain weight. If you don’t eat enough you can lose it.

Saturates

On average as a nation it seems we’re consuming too much saturated fat. Eating too much can increase your cholesterol, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats can help maintain healthy cholesterol levels, and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Fibre

Fibre is classed as a carbohydrate and you should aim to eat 30g fibre each day. Eating plenty of fibre is good for your digestive health and is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

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Lemon Pasta with Ham and Peas Recipe

Hi and welcome! I'd like to invite you to join our free weekly email newsletter . We'll send you yummy (and frugal) recipes on Sundays, just in time for your weekly meal planning. Thanks!

When I think of pasta and peas together, I think of blue box macaroni with a can of tuna and a can or bag of frozen peas. Well, that’s what I thought about pasta and peas before I really learned how to cook.

The fun of cooking comes with exploring with flavors, textures and tossing together new ingredients. I’m always on the hunt for new favorite recipes…especially for lunch. And while this could definitely be dinner…it would make for a great pasta for lunch…and it would keep well in the fridge for leftovers.

I’m loving the ham, peas, lemon, Parmesan and dill flavors together in this one.


Spaghetti Carbonara with Spicy Italian Sausage and Rocket!

This week I was going through pictures from our trip to Italy last May. What a fabulous vacation! As I reminisced about the time we spent in this glorious country I got a craving for some pasta, and of course I am not one to resist a craving! I decided to make Spaghetti Carbonara.
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Spaghetti Carbonara is a quick, easy and delicious meal but I decided to do a little something less than traditional by adding spicy meat and greens. I paired it with my Heirloom salad and another “Casual Friday Menu” was born: “Spaghetti Carbonara with Spicy Italian Sausage and Rocket”

Carbonara is a pasta dish that originated in Lazio, Rome. Carbonara sauce usually contains eggs, cheese, garlic and occasionally cream. It’s very subtly flavored but I was in the mood for something with a little more kick, hence the addition of spicy Italian sausage. I tossed in a handful of ‘rocket’ for color. You may be wondering what ‘rocket’ is…in the States rocket is known as good old fashioned arugula. When in Italy we learned a few things about the names of certain foods that we didn’t know before, on menus arugula is often called ‘rocket’ and ham, bacon and pancetta are often listed as ‘speck’ which is actually a German word.

Spaghetti Carbonara takes only minutes to make because the sauce is not cooked. While pasta cooks you simply whisk together cream, egg yolks, lemon zest and Parmesan and then toss with piping hot pasta! The addition of sausage adds a few minutes to the process but it’s still a complete meal in under 20 minutes!

I pair this pasta with my Heirloom Salad to make this ‘Casual Friday Menu’ a ‘delicious, healthy Friday menu’ as well!


Easy Recipes

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Pasta According to Hazan Recipes for Pasta And Assorted Sauces Homemade Pasta Homemade Tonnarelli (A finely cut, square‐shaped pasta) Sugo di Canestrelli (Pasta with scallops) Funghi Trifolati (Mushrooms with garlic. oil and parsley) Funghi Trifolati With Pasta TonnareIli With Rosemary Sauce Sugo alla Saffi (Penne with ham and asparagus) Salsa ally Cipolle Pesce al Salmoriglio (Fish steaks with oil and lemon sauce)

There is probably not one person in a thousand in this country who knows that the ‘countless sauces destined for pasta cannot, in the classic sense, be used arbitrarily with all pasta regardless of shave. size, color and texture.

Put otherwise, you cannot serve, indiscriminately, all sauces with any kind of pasta. The rules for which sauce goes with which shape pasta cannot be reduced to a simple, absolute formula. But generalizations are very much in order.

“Generally speaking,” Marcella Hazan said recently, “sauces that contain pieces of things — things like chopped meat, peas, ham and so on—go well with a pasta that has a hole (like macaroni), or a shape that catches pieces, spiral shapes, for example, and shells.

“Very thin sauces are destined for pasta like spaghetti or vermicelli. But there is an exception. If the sauce has a base of olive oil and contains clams, scallops, chopped fish or seafood, pasta strands such as spaghetti would be quite suitable. Think of linguine with clam sauce.

“Hoinemade pastas — freshly made pasta strands —go best with sauces that must be ‘absorbed,’ which is to say sauced that cling. Like the cream and cheese sauce tossed with fettucine and known as Alfredo. You would never —or shouldn't — serve packaged spaghetti with that sauce.”

“Some pastas,” she continued, “tubular pasta or pastas with a hole such as long strands of perciatelli, are ‘destined to be cooked briefly or at least to let stand briefly covered so that the perfume and flavors of the sauce permeate to a slight degree the ‘walls’ or ‘tubes’ of the pasta.’ “

Like most fine Italian cooks, she employs both packaged (preferably imported) pastas and pasta made in the home. She is firm in her belief that homemade pasta rolled by hand is superior to that prepared by machine.

As a concession, she agreed to prepare pasta in my kitchen using the machine. As she morked, she talked about other fine points in making and cooking pasta.

“Pasta,” she said, “is unlike pastry dough. Pasta hates cold. Pastry dough can improve with refrigeration because it is made with fat such as butter or shortening. And pasta should always be rolled on a wood or Formica surface. Not marble, which is prized by pastry cooks, because it tends to be cold.”

She added: “The more water you use to cook spaghetti or other pasta, the faster it cooks.”

Marcella Hazan is the author of one of the finest books on Italian cookery, “The Classic Italian Cook Book” published five years ago. She is known internationally for her cooking classes held each year in Manhattan and in Bologna, Italy. She has recently completed her second volume, “More Classic Italian Cooking,” to be published in October by Alfred A. Knopf.

In Bologna she is joined in her cooking venture by her husband, Victor, who lectures on Italian wines and is writing a book on the subject to be published next year.

“Last summer,” she said, “when we weren't teaching, we traveled. By car, by train, bus and plane as well as a lot of mileage by foot, walking around the open air markets.” Their travels took them from the top of the Italian boot to the bottom, from Sicily to the northern border, always in search of material for her books.

Mrs. Hazan briefly described the sauces she would make. “One of them is made with fresh scallops from the Adriatic. There the scallops are very small, smaller than bay scallops here. It is a very simple sauce made with a touch of garlic, parsley and a trace of hot red pepper flakes. You can make it with local bay or sea scallops but you have to cut them into small pieces.

“Another sauce is a hasty version of the pan gravy served— in many Italian homes with roast veal. It consists of butter with garlic and rosemary, standard ingredients for roast veal.

“The sugo — sugo is another word for sauce — alla Saffi is made with ham and asparagus to serve with penne.” Saffi, she explained, was an Italian politician who might not otherwise be remembered.

Her morning roster also included a savory sautéed onion sauce made with white wine and funghi trifolati, one of the most intriguing names in Italian cookery. Funghi, of course, means mushrooms. Trifolati does not mean, as

I was once inclined to think, clover, as in trefoil.

“Trifolati is a cooking base. It means the combination of olive oil, garlic and parsley in a dish. Some people add an. chovy to their funghi trifolati. I don't.” In Italy the mushroom is the much cherished, relatively rare and expensive field mushroom known as porcini [boletus edulis]. Mrs. Hazan has contrived a fine adaptation of the dish using a small proportion of dried boletus, soaked, then cooked with fresh cultivated mushrooms. Blended together, the mushrooms take on a fine porcinilike flavor.

“This can be served as a vegetable dish if the mushrooms are sliced,” she said. “ It can serve as a pasta sauce if the mushrooms are chopped.”

Mrs, Hazan described a much‐admired dish of grilled swordfish she had found in her travels. This, too, is an easy, quickly made dish with a simple sauce of lemon juice and oregano. No swordfish was available in the local market so she made the dish with tile fish and the results were admirable.

Here are recipes adapted from those that will appear in her forthcoming book.

cups semolina (durum wheat flour), see note

large eggs (three‐quarter cup).

1. Empty the flour onto a wooden or Formica surface. Make a well in the center and neatly build up a “wall” to surround the eggs. Start beating the eggs with a fork, gradually incorporating the flour.

2. Do not let the egg overflow but keep the wall built around by pushing with the fingers toward the center.

3. When the eggs have lost their fluidity (will not overflow the walls) start pushing the flour into the egg mixture, kneading gently, and continue working the flour all over the surface to incorporate all the flour.

4. Remove the pasta. Wash and dry the board and start kneading again by hand. This gets more elastic. Turn the ball of dough as it is kneaded. It gets the texture of satiny, non‐sticky modelling clay. Wrap in plastic. Let it rest eight minutes. When you open it the pasta will seem sticky again. Do not add more flour.

5. Remove the pasta from the plastic wrapping and shape it into a ball. Cut it into five pieces of more or less equal size. Set the pasta machine opening to wide (No. 6). Flatten each of the five pieces of pasta dough. Run the pieces through the machine, one at a time, without changing the setting. Arrange them on a clean cloth as they are put through. Reduce the setting to the next smaller opening and put the pieces through. When the pasta has gone through the No. 4 opening, stop rolling.

6. Cut each strip of pasta crosswise at the center point. This will make 10 pieces. Reduce the opening by half and put the 10 strips of pasta through the opening. Let them dry on the cloth, turning from time to time. Let dry for 30 minutes, more or less (see note). Put the sheets of pasta through any desired cutter to produce the shape and /or width you desire. The sheets of pasta when rolled out fine may also be cut by hand

for widths the cutters cannot accommodate.

Yield: 1 pound of pasta or 4 to 6 servings.

Note: One way to test whether the pasta is dry enough, put one small sheet of pasta through the fine cutter of the machine. If the strands stick together and have to be pulled apart with the fingers, the pasta should be allowed to dry longer.

Note: Semolina (durum wheat flour) is available at International Groceries and Meat Market, 529 Ninth Avenue (between 39th and 40th Streets) Kassos Brothers, 570 Ninth Avenue (between 41st and 42d Streets) and Manganaro Foods, 488 Ninth Avenue (between 37th and 38th Streets).

Prepare one recipe for homemade pasta. When the sheets of pasta have been dried briefly as indicated, put them through the fine cutter of the machine. If the pasta is not to be used immediately, take a few strands of pasta and wrap them around the fingers, bird's nest fashion. Let stand until thoroughly dry like bought pasta. They will later be easier to handle.

To cook, drop the pasta into boiling salted water. Cook until just tender, less than a minute after the water returns to the boil. Drain.


Creamy Lemon Pasta with Peas and Optional Ham

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This pasta dish has been on my mind for some time. And, yeah, it’s been in my stomach more than a few times, too. First, I had to get the recipe just right. Then, I had a heckuva time getting decent photos of the stuff, so I had to keep making it. Over and over and over.

Just last night, I whipped up a batch, and with my rental camera (my poor full-time camera is in the shop hopefully regaining its former glory), I was able to snap at least some semi-decent pics. And so now I can finally share with you. Woo hoo!

This pasta? It’s divine. Creamy, lemony, aaaah. Really super addicting, actually. I highly recommend it.

It came to mind a few weeks ago when I was whipping up a batch of lemon spaghetti for a quick dinner and simultaneously dreaming of this orecchiette pasta with creamy ale sauce from The Beeroness. Those peas! So perfectly cradled inside each bit of orecchiette!

I had to have creamy orecchiette with cradled peas in my life, and I had to have it right away.

And then I had to have it again, and again, and again, until it was perfect, and until I could get at least passable photos to share with you.

I’ll probably have to make it several more times just to make sure I got it exactly right.

Sorry, honey. At least you get a good amount of ham in your half. (Actually, I don’t think my guy is complaining, either. He’s never been huge on lemon, but he does love this stuff.)

This pasta dish goes from stove to table in about 25 minutes, but it tastes like it took far longer. It uses the same creamy, garlicky lemon sauce as the lemon spaghetti recipe, then I added perfect little peas for a touch of green and spring. Our beloved meat-eaters get the smoky addition of ham (perfect for using up the last of those Easter leftovers). I love using orecchiette with this sauce – the creamy goodness collects in all the little dips and curves. Divine.

You know I had to use orechiette as per my aforementioned obsession, but shells or penne would be marvelous, too.


Ham, Asparagus and Lemon Cream Pasta

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the pasta along with a handful of salt. Cook the pasta for 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally. When the pasta is almost cooked, add the asparagus and peas, and bring back to a boil, letting the veggies cook for 2-3 minutes with the pasta. Drain and set aside in a large bowl.

While the pasta is cooking, heat a medium sized pot over medium heat. Add the diced ham and cook it for 3-5 minutes, until the ham is beginning to brown. Remove the ham from the pan and add the olive oil and flour. Stir together until all the flour is absorbed into the oil.

Stir the evaporated milk into the flour mixture and bring to a simmer. Lower the heat and cook, stirring, until the sauce has thickened. Remove the pan from heat and stir in the lemon zest, salt, and pepper.

Pour the sauce over the pasta and toss together. Gently stir the ham into the pasta.


RECIPES WITH TAG pasta

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