Traditional recipes

Can You Bring Pie on a Plane?

Can You Bring Pie on a Plane?

What holiday foods can go through security

Whether you're taking your daughter her favorite apple pie or bringing some along as a hostess present, travelling with food is always tricky, especially by plane.

Luckily, here's a nifty Q&A that lets you know what you can and cannot bring onboard.

In general, solid foods are fine, but "if you can smear it, spread it, or spray it, you should expect that it could fall under the 3-1-1 liquid limitations."

According to the TSA web site, pies and cakes can pass through security, but "they are subject to additional screening."

Many other food items will not be allowed through security if the amount exceeds 3.4 ounces. Grandma's cranberry sauce or gravy, for instance, must be less than 3.4 ounces. Jams, jellies, syrup, salsa, and salad dressing are also on the list.

Now, if you're travelling in from a foreign country, make sure to check out what foods you can or can't bring across the border. Oh, the holidays.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


What Foods You Can and Can’t Pack For Your Next Flight

Can you bring food on a plane? It's a question we've all asked, whether we're trying to smuggle home a local delicacy or just plain forgot about the cured meats in our carry-on until we were in the security line.

The simple answer is yes, you can take pretty much any kind of food on to a plane—you'll just hit trouble the closer the foods are to a liquid. And if your follow-up question is wondering if it’s okay to then eat your food on the plane, know that new federal air travel regulations due to the COVID-19 pandemic complicate matters.

Whether your food meets airport security's requirements comes down to a few simple guidelines. “If you can spill it, spread it, spray it, pump it, or pour it, then it’s considered a liquid or gel,” says Mark Howell, regional spokesperson for the TSA. That means it falls under the 3-1-1 liquids rule, which mandates that any liquid, gel, cream, aerosol, or paste in a carry-on must be 3.4 ounces or less, and fit in one quart-size resealable bag (only one such bag is allowed per passenger).

There is one recent (and super specific) exception to the 3-1-1 rule, and it’s regarding hand sanitizer. In March 2020, when the U.S. declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency, the TSA relaxed the limitation on hand sanitizer in carry-ons, raising the allowance from 3 to 12 ounces (one bottle per traveler). And having that hand sanitizer on you will pay off when and if you decide to snack, for cleaning your tray table and hands before eating.

Still, even if a food item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.

Here's everything you need to know about bringing food through airport security and onto your flight:


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