Traditional recipes

Shrimp Creole

Shrimp Creole

This traditional Creole favorite is quicky, easy, healthy and a great way to warm up from the inside as the winter continues to chill us from the outside. And with Mardi Gras around the corner, it's never to early to start planning for Fat Tuesday fare.

Notes

Bacon or andouille sausage would be a wonderful addition!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Pound fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 large yellow onion, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 small green pepper, cored, seeded and diced into pieces the same size as the onion
  • 1 Cup diced tomatoes
  • 3/4 Cups white wine
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh basil, cut into ribbons
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1/2 Teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 Teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 Tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon Hot Sauce
  • 1 Teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 Teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 Teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 Teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 Tablespoons heavy cream (optional)
  • 4 Cups white or brown rice, to accompany

Servings4

Calories Per Serving925

Folate equivalent (total)87µg22%

Riboflavin (B2)0.2mg10.9%


Shrimp Creole Recipe

To be quite honest, there are certain dishes that I never intended to include on this site because they have been so completely bastardized by restaurants across the country. Shrimp Creole is near the top of the list. Why would I want to include this dish? Everyone has a recipe for it. A lot of restaurants, even outside of Louisiana serve it. Why in the hell do I even want to bother? Everyone knows what Shrimp Creole is!

But then it dawned on me. You know what? Maybe because of all the hack versions out there, a lot of people, especially outside of Louisiana, don’t know how great Shrimp Creole can be! Every bad rendition of Shrimp Creole, just like Shrimp Etouffee, served in some dive restaurants across the country, have created a perception to the diner that this dish is just OK, or in the worst case scenario, absolutely horrible. For God’s sake, some restaurants even serve shrimp covered in canned Marinara sauce and pass it off as Shrimp Creole. Yikes.

There are a lot of good and bad recipes for Shrimp Creole out there, hopefully you will enjoy this one as much as I do. The defining factor that I think makes this dish great, instead of just good, in addition to the use of the highest quality Louisiana or Gulf Shrimp, is using homemade Shrimp Stock in place of water during the preparation of your Creole Sauce.

All that aside, on to the dish…

As I see it, Shrimp Creole and Shrimp Sauce Piquant are pretty much the same dish, with a few differences.

First, Shrimp Creole, or as it was once known, Shrimp a la Creole, is a New Orleans dish. Shrimp Sauce Piquant is Acadian, much spicier (hence the name) and usually, but not always containing a roux. But as I said, they’re pretty darned similar, and like most dishes in New Orleans these days the two cuisines have kind of merged in a lot of different areas. Like any dish that there are a trillion recipes for, it’s all a matter of your personal taste.

Like I always say, let’s not fight, it’s only dinner after all, just make sure it tastes good.

Shrimp Creole Recipe

2 lbs. Peeled and Deveined Shrimp, save shells to make Shrimp Stock
2 Tbsp Butter
1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
1 Large Onion, finely chopped
2 Ribs Celery, finely chopped
1 small Green Pepper, finely Chopped
2 Tbsp Creole Seasoning
2 Tbsp Tomato Paste
2-1/2 Cups Very Ripe Fresh Tomatoes, Diced
1/2 Cup Dry White Wine
2 Cups Shrimp Stock (recipe here)
2 Tbsp Garlic, minced
2 Bay leaves
Cayenne to taste
Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt to taste
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1 bunch Fresh Thyme
2 Tbsp Tabasco
1 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 Cup Green Onions, green tops thinly sliced, white part sliced into 1/4″ thickness
1/8 Cup Flat Leaf Parsley, minced
1 Recipe Creole Boiled Rice

Melt the butter in a large sauce pan with the vegetable oil over medium high heat. When the butter begins to froth add 1/2 cup of the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden brown. Add the remaining onions, celery, and bell pepper, reduce the heat to medium and season with 1 Tbsp Creole Seasoning and a healthy pinch of salt. Sweat the vegetables until soft.

Add the tomato paste mixing well, and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste begins to brown, then add the fresh tomatoes and another healthy pinch of Kosher salt, this will help the tomatoes break down. Stir well.

When the tomatoes start to break down into liquid add the white wine, and turn the heat to high until most of the alcohol burns off. Add the Shrimp Stock, remaining Creole seasoning, garlic, bay leaves, black pepper, white pepper, cayenne (to taste), and Thyme. Bring to a boil then reduce to a low simmer. Simmer for 30-45 minutes.

(If necessary at this point thicken the sauce with 1 Tbsp Cornstarch/ 2Tbsp water. Bring to a boil to maximize the thickening power of the cornstarch.)

Add the hot sauce, Worcestershire, and season to taste with Kosher salt. Last chance to re-season your sauce, remember that good cooking is all about proper seasoning. Make your Boiled Rice, and season your shrimp with 1 Tbsp Kosher salt and a pinch of Cayenne.

Bring the sauce to a boil, reduce the heat to low and add the shrimp. The key is to not overcook your shrimp. Let them slowly simmer in the sauce until just cooked through.

Serve with boiled rice and garnish with the remaining green onions and parsley.

Be sure and check out my ever growing Index of Creole & Cajun Recipes, which provides links to all of the recipes featured on this site!


Shrimp Creole Recipe

To be quite honest, there are certain dishes that I never intended to include on this site because they have been so completely bastardized by restaurants across the country. Shrimp Creole is near the top of the list. Why would I want to include this dish? Everyone has a recipe for it. A lot of restaurants, even outside of Louisiana serve it. Why in the hell do I even want to bother? Everyone knows what Shrimp Creole is!

But then it dawned on me. You know what? Maybe because of all the hack versions out there, a lot of people, especially outside of Louisiana, don’t know how great Shrimp Creole can be! Every bad rendition of Shrimp Creole, just like Shrimp Etouffee, served in some dive restaurants across the country, have created a perception to the diner that this dish is just OK, or in the worst case scenario, absolutely horrible. For God’s sake, some restaurants even serve shrimp covered in canned Marinara sauce and pass it off as Shrimp Creole. Yikes.

There are a lot of good and bad recipes for Shrimp Creole out there, hopefully you will enjoy this one as much as I do. The defining factor that I think makes this dish great, instead of just good, in addition to the use of the highest quality Louisiana or Gulf Shrimp, is using homemade Shrimp Stock in place of water during the preparation of your Creole Sauce.

All that aside, on to the dish…

As I see it, Shrimp Creole and Shrimp Sauce Piquant are pretty much the same dish, with a few differences.

First, Shrimp Creole, or as it was once known, Shrimp a la Creole, is a New Orleans dish. Shrimp Sauce Piquant is Acadian, much spicier (hence the name) and usually, but not always containing a roux. But as I said, they’re pretty darned similar, and like most dishes in New Orleans these days the two cuisines have kind of merged in a lot of different areas. Like any dish that there are a trillion recipes for, it’s all a matter of your personal taste.

Like I always say, let’s not fight, it’s only dinner after all, just make sure it tastes good.

Shrimp Creole Recipe

2 lbs. Peeled and Deveined Shrimp, save shells to make Shrimp Stock
2 Tbsp Butter
1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
1 Large Onion, finely chopped
2 Ribs Celery, finely chopped
1 small Green Pepper, finely Chopped
2 Tbsp Creole Seasoning
2 Tbsp Tomato Paste
2-1/2 Cups Very Ripe Fresh Tomatoes, Diced
1/2 Cup Dry White Wine
2 Cups Shrimp Stock (recipe here)
2 Tbsp Garlic, minced
2 Bay leaves
Cayenne to taste
Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt to taste
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1 bunch Fresh Thyme
2 Tbsp Tabasco
1 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 Cup Green Onions, green tops thinly sliced, white part sliced into 1/4″ thickness
1/8 Cup Flat Leaf Parsley, minced
1 Recipe Creole Boiled Rice

Melt the butter in a large sauce pan with the vegetable oil over medium high heat. When the butter begins to froth add 1/2 cup of the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden brown. Add the remaining onions, celery, and bell pepper, reduce the heat to medium and season with 1 Tbsp Creole Seasoning and a healthy pinch of salt. Sweat the vegetables until soft.

Add the tomato paste mixing well, and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste begins to brown, then add the fresh tomatoes and another healthy pinch of Kosher salt, this will help the tomatoes break down. Stir well.

When the tomatoes start to break down into liquid add the white wine, and turn the heat to high until most of the alcohol burns off. Add the Shrimp Stock, remaining Creole seasoning, garlic, bay leaves, black pepper, white pepper, cayenne (to taste), and Thyme. Bring to a boil then reduce to a low simmer. Simmer for 30-45 minutes.

(If necessary at this point thicken the sauce with 1 Tbsp Cornstarch/ 2Tbsp water. Bring to a boil to maximize the thickening power of the cornstarch.)

Add the hot sauce, Worcestershire, and season to taste with Kosher salt. Last chance to re-season your sauce, remember that good cooking is all about proper seasoning. Make your Boiled Rice, and season your shrimp with 1 Tbsp Kosher salt and a pinch of Cayenne.

Bring the sauce to a boil, reduce the heat to low and add the shrimp. The key is to not overcook your shrimp. Let them slowly simmer in the sauce until just cooked through.

Serve with boiled rice and garnish with the remaining green onions and parsley.

Be sure and check out my ever growing Index of Creole & Cajun Recipes, which provides links to all of the recipes featured on this site!


How To Make Shrimp Creole Very Easily

  1. Heat the oil in a saucepan on medium heat. Add the onion, celery, and peppers and sauté for about 5 minutes until soft.
  2. Mix the garlic, chili, creole seasoning, and cayenne pepper and cook for about 30 seconds and stir until fragrant.
  3. Add the chopped tomatoes, stock, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, tomato purée, and butter. Allow to boil, then simmer, with the lid ajar, for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally until the sauce has thickened (feel free to simmer for a further 5 or so minutes if you want your sauce to reduce more).
  4. Add in the shrimp and cook for up to 5 minutes until the shrimp is cooked through.
  5. Switch off the heat and serve with some rice.

Recipe Tips

  • You can prep the sauce ahead of time and store it in the fridge.
  • Use a sharp knife to cut your veggies up nice and small so that they cook quickly.
  • The flavor really develops over time, so best to prep ahead a few hours before serving.
  • For best results use fresh shrimp but alternatively use frozen shrimp that you defrost just before cooking.
  • Make your life easier by buying peeled and deveined shrimp for cooking.
  • You canuse fire-roasted tomatoes if you prefer some extra flavor.

Meal Prep and Prep Ahead

This recipe was practically made for meal prep and prepping ahead.

Prep Ahead – The best thing you can do is whip up the sauce and store it in the fridge for a day or two beforehand.

Store – Store in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 days.

Freeze – You can freeze the creole sauce (or even double or triple the amount) and follow these steps to store in the freezer until needed.

  • Let the sauce cool down, blend or mash, then transfer into glass jars or these very handy Ziploc bags.
  • If using bags, squeeze out all the extra air, seal, label, and then lay flat in the freezer.
  • Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.
  • Remove from the freezer the night before needed and let it thaw in the fridge. Then reheat and add in the shrimp just before you want to eat it.

Recipe Variations

This recipe is sooooo as good as is, but you can easily mix and match herbs, spices, and other ingredients to suit your taste. And they don’t even have to be creole, just things that will pack this dish full of flavor such as:

  • Dried basil
  • Dried oregano
  • Bay leaf
  • Fresh cilantro
  • Fried bacon (y’all seriously need to try this!)

What Is Creole Sauce Made Of?

Creole Sauce is a fragrant and spiced tomato sauce made with the holy trinity of Louisiana style creole cooking => celery, bell peppers, and onions, along with a variety of seasoning and spices.

You can start with juicy fresh tomatoes if you have them, or grab some canned tomatoes, aka convenient staple foods, and use those.

And Creole shrimp is a variation of this classic sauce that includes good old juicy and tender shrimp. Pretty much a thick flavourful Louisiana spiced shrimp stew that is traditionally served over fluffy white rice. #somuchyum

Can I Make Shrimp Creole Less Spicy?

This classic sauce recipe gets its heat from the homemade Creole Seasoning. So if you have a hot seasoning mix, add about half the required amount and adjust the next time.

If you want to make it less spicy, or not spicy at all, I suggest making your own homemade seasoning and adjusting the amount of chili – or even omit it altogether.

When I make this sauce for guests or for the kids, I only use about a half to two-thirds of the seasoning required.

Serving Suggestions

More Southern Recipes

Weight Watchers Points

There are 6 Blue Plan SmartPoints in one serving of this.

Thank you for reading my Creole Shrimp Recipe post. And please come visit again as I continue to slice, dice and dream up affordable Air Fryer recipes, Instant Pot Recipes, Southern Recipes and more. Thanks for supporting Recipes from a Pantry, food blog.

Get The Creole Shrimp Recipe

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Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound fresh or frozen medium shrimp in shells
  • 1 medium onion, chopped (1/2 cup)
  • ½ cup chopped celery
  • ½ cup chopped green sweet pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 1 ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
  • 2 cups hot cooked rice

Thaw shrimp, if frozen. Peel and devein shrimp, removing tails. Rinse shrimp pat dry with paper towels. Set aside.

In a large skillet cook onion, celery, sweet pepper, and garlic in butter over medium heat about 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in undrained tomatoes, paprika, salt, and cayenne pepper. Bring to boiling reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 5 to 8 minutes or until thickened.

Stir shrimp and parsley into tomato mixture. Cook, stirring frequently, for 2 to 4 minutes or until shrimp turn opaque. Seaston to taste. Serve over rice.


Shrimp Creole

Christopher Simpson for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

Much like gumbo, this shrimp and tomato stew starts with a roux that thickens and adds a distinct flavor (though many takes on shrimp Creole skip the roux altogether). Next, the “holy trinity” of Creole cooking — onion, celery and bell pepper — is simmered in the roux. You’ll want to stir the bottom of the pot constantly to prevent the roux from sticking and burning, and make sure to keep a close eye: A burned roux can’t be saved. Creole cuisine relishes improvisation, so feel free to add other veggies or a different protein, or omit the hot sauce and add a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar in its place. This spicy stew is traditionally served over steamed white rice, but is also delicious served over brown rice or other whole grains, like quinoa.


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Shrimp Creole Ingredients

  • 2 lbs of peeled shrimp
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 3 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup of fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 stick of celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tbsp garlic sauce
  • 15 oz. can of tomato sauce to taste
  • 1/2 cup chardonnay

The chardonnay can be substituted with other white wines…

However, we wouldn’t use too sweet of a wine.


Louisiana Shrimp Creole: Remembering Chef Paul Prudhomme

Chef Paul Prudhomme (1940 – 2015) – Acadiana Table mourns the passing of Paul Prudhomme the legendary chef most responsible for the worldwide popularity of Cajun and Creole cuisine. In tribute to him, we are reposting this shrimp Creole recipe and story from 2013. His legacy lives on in the black iron pots of our precious foodways he so dearly loved and helped preserve.

Louisiana Shrimp Creole–A classic South Louisiana dish and a time-honored Cajun recipe. (All photos credit: George Graham)

Opelousas, the center of St. Landry Parish, is home to Paul Prudhomme, one of the most beloved figures in Louisiana cooking and I believe his talent and influence have been the key to establishing Cajun and Creole as a significant culinary category. Prudhomme is the master of artfully weaving the simplest ingredients and elevating them through layering of flavors. And his recipe for Louisiana Shrimp Creole is a prime example.

In my recipe book, he is the undisputed “King of South Louisiana Cooking.”

I met Chef Paul in the 1980s at the Acadiana Culinary Classic, an annual competitive showcase of South Louisiana cooking talent. I instantly became a fan. He came onto the culinary scene swiftly as head chef of New Orleans’ restaurant Commander’s Palace and soon became an icon of Louisiana cooking. He essentially defined Cajun and Creole cuisine to the world and paved the way for many Louisiana chefs to follow.

I first made an adaptation of Prudhomme’s recipe for Louisiana Shrimp Creole over twenty years ago, and I haven’t sampled a more balanced and flavorful interpretation of this classic. I’ve tinkered with the original in ways that stay true to his philosophy yet aspires to an even greater flavor profile.

There are several keys to this Louisiana Shrimp Creole built on Prudhomme’s foundation of briny Louisiana Gulf shrimp, a pungent shrimp stock and light brown roux. From there, layers of sautéed vegetables and peppery spices add structure that when combined with the sweet acidity of the ripe tomatoes, meld to create a rich Creole depth of flavor.


Shrimp Creole Recipe

To be quite honest, there are certain dishes that I never intended to include on this site because they have been so completely bastardized by restaurants across the country. Shrimp Creole is near the top of the list. Why would I want to include this dish? Everyone has a recipe for it. A lot of restaurants, even outside of Louisiana serve it. Why in the hell do I even want to bother? Everyone knows what Shrimp Creole is!

But then it dawned on me. You know what? Maybe because of all the hack versions out there, a lot of people, especially outside of Louisiana, don’t know how great Shrimp Creole can be! Every bad rendition of Shrimp Creole, just like Shrimp Etouffee, served in some dive restaurants across the country, have created a perception to the diner that this dish is just OK, or in the worst case scenario, absolutely horrible. For God’s sake, some restaurants even serve shrimp covered in canned Marinara sauce and pass it off as Shrimp Creole. Yikes.

There are a lot of good and bad recipes for Shrimp Creole out there, hopefully you will enjoy this one as much as I do. The defining factor that I think makes this dish great, instead of just good, in addition to the use of the highest quality Louisiana or Gulf Shrimp, is using homemade Shrimp Stock in place of water during the preparation of your Creole Sauce.

All that aside, on to the dish…

As I see it, Shrimp Creole and Shrimp Sauce Piquant are pretty much the same dish, with a few differences.

First, Shrimp Creole, or as it was once known, Shrimp a la Creole, is a New Orleans dish. Shrimp Sauce Piquant is Acadian, much spicier (hence the name) and usually, but not always containing a roux. But as I said, they’re pretty darned similar, and like most dishes in New Orleans these days the two cuisines have kind of merged in a lot of different areas. Like any dish that there are a trillion recipes for, it’s all a matter of your personal taste.

Like I always say, let’s not fight, it’s only dinner after all, just make sure it tastes good.

Shrimp Creole Recipe

2 lbs. Peeled and Deveined Shrimp, save shells to make Shrimp Stock
2 Tbsp Butter
1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
1 Large Onion, finely chopped
2 Ribs Celery, finely chopped
1 small Green Pepper, finely Chopped
2 Tbsp Creole Seasoning
2 Tbsp Tomato Paste
2-1/2 Cups Very Ripe Fresh Tomatoes, Diced
1/2 Cup Dry White Wine
2 Cups Shrimp Stock (recipe here)
2 Tbsp Garlic, minced
2 Bay leaves
Cayenne to taste
Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt to taste
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1 bunch Fresh Thyme
2 Tbsp Tabasco
1 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 Cup Green Onions, green tops thinly sliced, white part sliced into 1/4″ thickness
1/8 Cup Flat Leaf Parsley, minced
1 Recipe Creole Boiled Rice

Melt the butter in a large sauce pan with the vegetable oil over medium high heat. When the butter begins to froth add 1/2 cup of the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden brown. Add the remaining onions, celery, and bell pepper, reduce the heat to medium and season with 1 Tbsp Creole Seasoning and a healthy pinch of salt. Sweat the vegetables until soft.

Add the tomato paste mixing well, and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste begins to brown, then add the fresh tomatoes and another healthy pinch of Kosher salt, this will help the tomatoes break down. Stir well.

When the tomatoes start to break down into liquid add the white wine, and turn the heat to high until most of the alcohol burns off. Add the Shrimp Stock, remaining Creole seasoning, garlic, bay leaves, black pepper, white pepper, cayenne (to taste), and Thyme. Bring to a boil then reduce to a low simmer. Simmer for 30-45 minutes.

(If necessary at this point thicken the sauce with 1 Tbsp Cornstarch/ 2Tbsp water. Bring to a boil to maximize the thickening power of the cornstarch.)

Add the hot sauce, Worcestershire, and season to taste with Kosher salt. Last chance to re-season your sauce, remember that good cooking is all about proper seasoning. Make your Boiled Rice, and season your shrimp with 1 Tbsp Kosher salt and a pinch of Cayenne.

Bring the sauce to a boil, reduce the heat to low and add the shrimp. The key is to not overcook your shrimp. Let them slowly simmer in the sauce until just cooked through.

Serve with boiled rice and garnish with the remaining green onions and parsley.

Be sure and check out my ever growing Index of Creole & Cajun Recipes, which provides links to all of the recipes featured on this site!


Watch the video: Shrimp Scampi Pasta. Basics with Babish (October 2021).